Welcome to the New Shacknews

You're currently viewing the beginning of a full site renovation for Shacknews.com. You might find something working oddly. If you do, let us know! More exciting new features to follow.

Dragon Age: Inquisition Review: Respect the Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition takes you to a massive world that is fast falling to apart, both physically and politically. How many hours can you expect to sacrifice to this game? Check out our review.

Launch Embed
48

The land of Thedas is in rough shape. The mages have risen up and are fighting a full blown rebellion against the Templars. The Chantry is falling apart, and its beloved leader (along with many among the upper levels of the hierarchy) is killed in a magic-fueled bombing during a peace accord, causing rifts to appear between the physical world and the Fade. This is the state of things as you step into the role of your new hero in Dragon Age: Inquisition. Being that you're the only person in the world that can close the rifts, it becomes your responsibility to grow the Inquisition from a small band of outcasts to a power to be reckoned with. With it, you bring order to the land and begin to reshape the world to however you see fit.

Leading the Inquisition

Inquisition is a sort of vindication of Dragon Age 2. Some criticized the story, and how the world was very small. Dragon Age 3 responds with a massive world that spans two countries (Fereldan and Orlais), with areas that range from snow capped mountains to arid deserts. These areas are so big that you'll need to ride a mount to help traverse them, and it's easy to get lost, especially in the deserts with its twisting tunnels. Not only are most areas huge, but they're filled with side missions, dangers, and wildlife to hunt. Hunting and gathering provides you with materials that can be used to craft weapons, armor, and upgrades. These areas look fantastic, and much of the game can be spent exploring caves and ruins to uncover secrets and loot.

Seeing a dragon fly across the sky for the first time is truly an awe inspiring event, and they are subject to random events like all the wildlife in Thedas. I was walking along the coast and witnessing a fight between a dragon and a giant, and I couldn't help but stop and watch. The scale at which the creatures are designed match sense of threat and power that they project.

The story is as epic as the landscape, and relies heavily on the events from Dragon Age 2. Players get a true sense of how gigantic Thedas is, and experience the diversity of its kingdoms and culture. The nobility of Orlais, for example, wear masks all the time as part of a grand system of social ladder climbing called The Game. Players also feel the full weight of responsibility in reshaping the political landscape, more so than with previous games that were largely limited to a single kingdom or city. There are so many quests that it is entirely possible to lose yourself in playing side missions and forget all about furthering the main story. As a signature mark of the Dragon Age games, players will have to face a number of moral choices that will deterimine the fate of your character, the Inquisition, its members, and all of Thedas. One scene, for example, has you choosing between saving an Inquisition team from slaughter or securing a key factional alliance to confront a greater threat.

Another aspect of your leadership role involves going to the War Room to send one of your three advisors on different tasks. These missions, which play out in real-time in the background, can be handled using diplomacy, stealth, or a show of force with the army. These missions rarely have a direct bearing on the rest of the game, but they open new areas and earn special rewards. The War Room is also where you use your influence to open key areas and launch key operations to move the story along. There were times that I got a bit obsessive about the War Room, since actions require real-time to carry out. So, I wanted to pick the opportune moments before dispatching one of my agents to perform a task that could take up to 23 hours to complete. However, you can really feel it when you run out of important things to do. You can send agents out on short missions to gather resources, but the rarity of whatever they bring back is random, and it does feel like the busywork that it is.

When you're not exploring the world and talking to people, you'll spend most of your time fighting off the threats of the world. Inquisition's combat combines the tactical approach found in Origins with the fast action of Dragon Age 2. At the touch of a button, the game pauses and goes into tactical mode so players can assign each party member's next move. You can't queue up multiple moves, which is a little disappointing, but I got used to the limitation. Holding down the gamepad trigger lets time move forward and letting go pauses it again. When using the keyboard, the controls are separated into two keys, one pauses the game while the other brings you in and out of tactical mode. Pulling the camera all the back with the mouse wheel will also automatically bring you into tactical mode.

I much preferred using mouse and keyboard controls, which has a toolbar for skills and potions, along with the ability to pick targets with a mouse click. However, switching between tactical and combat mode felt smoother and more intuitive with the gamepad. Those that prefer pure action can probably get through the entire game on normal difficulty without ever touching the tactical mode, but doing so makes Inquisition feel very much like a plain hack-and-slash RPG. Either way, you also need to get used to the lack of a dedicated healing skill tree for mages. The primary means of healing are through potions that are shared by the entire party, resting at camp, and fast traveling to any location. There are enough ways to mitigate damage so that healing isn't as much of an issue later on in the game, but things can be pretty rough early on. Although having no dedicated healer released me from an obligatory need for a healer mage accompanying me at all times, I still would have liked to have the option.

As with all games of this scale, Inquisition has its share of glitches. The most common issue is how my journal would continue to show quests that were impossible to complete, like trying to find and talk to a person that was killed either by me or the local wildlife. Another common issue is how the characters would sometime talk, but their mouths don't move. There are a few more, but none of the problems I experienced were game-breaking.

Hunting Party

A part of the Inquisition experience can be brought into multiplayer, where up to four players come together to fight in a dungeon crawling mode. Players choose a character then team together to see how far they can get with their combined abilities while earning XP an gold. The skill trees are very different in multiplayer compared to the campaign, and don't offer as much flexibility. Each class has two skill trees, each with a single straight progression path. Making your way up the skill tree allows you access to some branching abilities, but they are also a little limited. For example, the Archer doesn't have the ability to drop into stealth to make a quick getaway, or poison its weapons for extra damage over time. Apart from changing out the armor, there aren't any customization options, not even gender. So, those hoping to recreate some semblance of their campaign character may be disappointed.

The gameplay challenge varies from match-to-match, and it largely depends on what level your character is. It's generally a good idea to play with as many people as possible, but a party of two people can progress at a crawling pace by getting stronger with every subsequent match. Although enemies vary in difficulty from match-to-match, the multiplayer's biggest challenge comes a total absence of health potion pickups. Players recover all their health when they enter into a new stage, but there can be a lot of bloodshed in getting there. Similarly, dead players have to sit out the rest of the stage and watch from the living players' perspectives until they open the door to the next area.

All potions and grenades need to be purchased from the store, using either in-game or premium currency. However, health potions aren't automatically replenished, and you have to remember to equip them. In my experience, players might forget to bring the health potions at all. There's also no way to share loot or resources, which limits the cooperative feel of this dungeon crawler. Players have to purchase loot crates, which randomly provides items. Those experienced with Mass Effect 3's multiplayer may feel comfortable, but it shares many of the same shortcomings. It may take significant time and effort to outfit your character with the gear it needs to be a heavy hitter. Items can be broken down for raw materials so that players can custom craft their own gear, which does go a long way toward differentiating yourself from others with of the same class.

One of the multiplayer mode's most interesting features comes from treasure rooms that can only be accessed by specific classes. For example, only a warrior can break down a weakened wall section, you need a mage destroy a magical barrier, and rogues pick locks, so you're encouraged to have at least one of each in order to make the most of an area.

Although the multiplayer combat isn't quite as fulfilling as it is in the campaign, nor is it (at least in early levels) as fast paced as Mass Effect's, there is something very satisfying in leveling up a character and making it further than you did before. Also, unlike Mass Effect, Inquisition's multiplayer mode feels very removed from the rest of the game. Even though you're exploring ruins and fortresses as agents of the Inquisition, you don't get a sense that you're doing anything for the cause. Mass Effect included a "Galactic Readiness" system that acts as minor bridge, so that you at least had some sense that your fights were contributing to something greater. With Inquisition, it doesn't feel like it matters whether you succeed or not, and you're entirely on your own for resources and gear. You may be part of the Inquisition, but it's not necessarily supporting you. The only connection between the two modes is potentially seeing the multiplayer character appear in Inquisitor's fortress, which you might need a keen eye to do.

Conclusion

With a huge, breathtaking world, an epic story, and choices that leaves a significant mark on the world around you, Dragon Age: Inquisition embodies everything that makes the series so popular. There are times when the game could feel too big, and that there might be too much to do, but that's hardly a complaint. It's a reason to be completely immersed in this world. Multiplayer has its moments, especially if you can get together a nice team, but it does have a perceivable grind and the loot system has a very high sense of unpredictability. Still, there's so much content in the campaign that even if you decide to skip out on multiplayer entirely, there's enough to keep you occupied until the inevitable DLC expansions start releasing, and perhaps enough to last you to the next full game.


This review is based on a PC code provided by the publisher. Dragon Age: Inquisition will be available in retail stores and digitally for $59.99. The game is rated M.

Managing Editor

Pros

  • Gigantic world to explore
  • Fantastic story with many decision points
  • A nice mix of tactical and action gameplay

Cons

  • Cannot queue up multiple moves
  • No dedicated healing
  • Somewhat subdued multiplayer

From The Chatty

  • reply
    November 11, 2014 12:01 AM

    Steven Wong posted a new article, Dragon Age: Inquisition Review: Respect the Inquisition

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 12:13 AM

      ...!!! oh shit

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 12:18 AM

      FUCK YES!!! So awesome to see this is good. I can't wait.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 12:32 AM

      "Inquisition is a sort of vindication of Dragon Age 2. Some criticized the story, and how the world was very small. Dragon Age 3 responds with a massive world that spans two countries (Fereldan and Orlais), with areas that range from snow capped mountains to arid deserts..."

      That's not what vindication means.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 4:33 AM

        I know

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 8:20 AM

        maybe redemption?

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 10:01 PM

        It is the opposite of a vindication of Dragon Age 2; it's a repudiation of Dragon Age 2. It's a redemption of the franchise.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 12:41 AM

      Hopefully I can put an end to the mage menace. Then later on, assert the master mage race.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 12:53 AM

      Cannot wait to play this, I had a feeling from all the vids that it would own, glad that it looks like it does.

      I am ready

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 1:04 AM

      Cannot queue moves? Nope.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 1:05 AM

      I had trust that Bioware knew they could not afford to screw this up if they wanted any remnants of their reputation to remain. Glad to see it is so. Sold.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 1:09 AM

      But how is the WRITING?

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 1:14 AM

      "All potions and grenades need to be purchased from the store, using either in-game or premium currency. .... Players have to purchase loot crates, which randomly provides items."
      NO NO. NO. NO NONONO.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 1:37 AM

        Sounds great to me.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 1:59 AM

        It worked fine in ME3, the feature sounds bad but I enjoyed it in practice

      • ArB
        reply
        November 11, 2014 4:14 AM

        Yeah I hate that shit. Everybody loves scratch lottery tickets right? Well guess whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 4:33 AM

        This is MP only right? If so, that's fine.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 6:50 AM

          Yeah, it's multiplayer and seems like the exact same system Mass Effect 3 used.

          • reply
            November 11, 2014 7:30 AM

            Worked well there. It encourages you to play smart and not get into situations where you need to spam consumables to win.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:28 AM

        Never paid a dime for that in ME3 MP. I can see for those who are tempted to do so but I was happy for the hours I played and the drops I got.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 1:46 AM

      Spend less time describing the game. Tell us how it made you feel. Okay, so the world is big. Does it feel like a real place that's lived in by convincing characters? Does the game present you with interesting decisions that have believable consequences?

      How is the pacing of the story? Is the game a slog like the first Dragon Age? Are the romance systems as contrived as the previous games?

      "Inquisition is a sort of vindication of Dragon Age 2. Some criticized the story, and how the world was very small."

      Again, what do you think? Did you share those criticisms?

      "One scene, for example, has you choosing between saving an Inquisition team from slaughter or securing a key factional alliance to confront a greater threat."

      What did you do? How did it make you feel?

      As someone who is on the fence about Inquisition, this review did little to sway me either way. I want to know what my experience will be playing it.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 4:37 AM

        no but you see what we really need is more objective reviews

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 4:40 AM

        There's a ton of reviews out there, and several that get more into these kinds of questions. Every review can't be written to every potential reader's tastes. Some people want the more objective "this is stuff in the game"-type reviews, and some want what you're talking about.

        For me, I just want video footage that I can interpret myself, but mostly to make the next week not quite as torturous.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 6:41 AM

        The reviewer's experience may not be your experience though.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 3:40 AM

      PC Gamer rated it too. Excited now. http://www.pcgamer.com/dragon-age-inquisition-review/

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 4:54 AM

      I get the short discussion about healing and the lack of a dedicated healer in the body of the review, as it does change up the gameplay a lot, but to have that listed as a "con" seems really odd to me. It seems like that is basically saying "There isn't this thing that I like!" just as if someone said "Well in RPGS I love fist weapons, but there aren't any in this so that's a negative point about the game as a whole"

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 5:18 AM

      Man this thing is getting great reviews, I'm dying for an RPG on current gen systems, and I want to know what the fuck Morrigan did with my baby. >:(

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 6:00 AM

        Was this answered in 2?

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 6:18 AM

          Not that I recall

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 6:21 AM

          No. Saw somewhere that it will be covered in some fashion in DA:3

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 6:44 AM

        At the end of the Witch Hunt DLC Morrigan basically tells you before entering the Eluvian portal that the child is safe with her and is being prepared for some kind of future ordeal. Most likely referencing the events of Inquisition.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 7:06 AM

          damnit, I really hate the EA/BioWare/Origin dlc handling, I must have missed all the DA and ME DLCs.

          And they basically never ever go on sales

          • reply
            November 11, 2014 7:12 AM

            Dragon Age "ultimate edition" goes on sale on Origin occasionally. I had originally bought Dragon Age on Steam, but then a couple years later the ultimate edition went on sale on Origin for $10 so I bought it just to get all of the DLC. I don't think there has been a DA2 ultimate edition with all the DLC but there wasn't nearly as much DLC for DA2 anyway and it doesn't seem to be as important to the canon either.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 7:28 AM

          Yeah I knew that, but lol trust me, I'm only mostly EVEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEAAAALLLL doesn't really tell me. I have a feeling that the main character is going to be that baby all magically adult like Connor in Angel.

          • reply
            November 11, 2014 7:31 AM

            Yeah I think you might be right.

          • reply
            November 12, 2014 7:53 AM

            If my dwarf warrior is the son of Morrigan and my human noble rogue, then she has a lot of fucking explaining to do.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 5:18 AM

      When is it out?

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 5:26 AM

      I really need to get through Origins. :(

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 5:32 AM

        I never finished it either. I was pretty close to the end but the dwarven city felt so daunting and dull that I gave up.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 5:27 AM

      Embarrassing confession time: I've own the first two, and haven't really played them. I mean I've created characters, and messed around the intro but that's it. I always planed on going back but never did.

      Should I not get this this game?6

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 5:28 AM

        I imagine it'll be fine. You can go to the dragon age keep website and build a premade backstory that it will tell you to get you up to speed on the stories.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 5:59 AM

          I beat the first one when it came out, never did the awakening dlc and never played 2 because I heard its awful. I just fired up origin and its super dated and I still don't own 2. The completist in me says I need to replay 1 and play 2 but I don't wanna :(

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 5:57 AM

        first was great and i'm pretty sure i blasted through it really quickly, second was terrible so i can't fault you for dropping that one. i had no idea this was coming out but it sounds good and i need something to help with skyrim withdrawal. the story is irrelevant - it's just a solid RPG with dragons and wizards.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 10:40 AM

          Actually I guess I'd play 2 if it was free like the PC version of Origins just was on Origin.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 6:01 AM

      multiplayer sounds like it was a complete waste of effort which is sad.

    • gmd
      reply
      November 11, 2014 6:04 AM

      I've never played a DA game will I like this? I put in 600 hours into skyrim but I realize they are noting alike gameplay wise.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:04 AM

        Hmmmm.....

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:09 AM

        More was above this. This is worth reading though. CPU/GPU stuff.

        "Requirements:
        On the highest settings Dragon Age: Inquisition is quite the hardware devourer. While the graphics card requirements are understandable for every gamer, it is first and foremost the CPU that is challenged. For hardware-affine gamers this might be reasonable, after all the wide view, level of detail and number of NPCs is quite impressive. But after many years of stagnation in this area the demand of the role playing game on the processor will surprise one or two. Gamers with a moderate Intel Quadcore with 3 GHz need to bring little sorrow, older or weaker processors with outdated performance-per-cycle circumstances will perhaps get into a pretty pickle. For instance, the Intel Core i7-920 of the author doesn't even get 30 fps at max details in Full-HD despite a overclock to 3.8 GHz. And even our test PC, a Intel Core i7-4790 @ 4.5 Ghz has using DX11 one thread near maximum load. Admittedly it is possible to distribute the load a bit, if we reduce the resolution and anti-aliasing - the Haswell manages 120 fps in 720p - but each and every additional Megahertz expresses itself in additional fps even in 1080p with 4xMSAA.

        Enters AMDs low-level API Mantle. Especially impressive are the performance improvements of Mantle for old or weak CPUs like the author uses. In combination with a R9 290X can the aged Bloomfield gain 45% performance compared to DX11. That is the difference between a intolerable Stutterfest and an adequately fluid game experience. Even with a Core i7-4790K @ 4.5 Ghz the low-level API can gain 10% compared to the overhead-plagued microsoft API. Thus the R9 290x can clearly pull ahead of the much stronger overclocked GTX 980."


        http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=138338767&postcount=48

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:26 AM

        Looks like this will be my justification for upgrading my MB and CPU to a z97 and i7-4790k.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:33 AM

        Yikes. Oh well, I needed to upgrade my aging system anyway.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 8:24 AM

        Guess some people are going to need to turn off the 4x AA and click on "medium."

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 8:35 AM

        People need to stop assuming they can just run max settings PLUS 4x MSAA on modern hardware, let alone a four year-old CPU and midrange GPU.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 8:41 AM

        In fact, these benches are super misleading.

        -Unoptimized drivers
        -4.5-year old CPU
        -4x MSAA
        -All settings maxed

        No shit it chugs! My guess is a 680 / 760 w/ modern i5/i7 will run the shit fine if you dial back on the insane AA (SSAA / MSAA is a ridiculous performance killer).

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 8:44 AM

          The benchmarks shown are on a i7-4790K OC @ 4.5GHz

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 8:45 AM

          From: http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=138338767&postcount=48

          Requirements:
          On the highest settings Dragon Age: Inquisition is quite the hardware devourer. While the graphics card requirements are understandable for every gamer, it is first and foremost the CPU that is challenged. For hardware-affine gamers this might be reasonable, after all the wide view, level of detail and number of NPCs is quite impressive. But after many years of stagnation in this area the demand of the role playing game on the processor will surprise one or two. Gamers with a moderate Intel Quadcore with 3 GHz need to bring little sorrow, older or weaker processors with outdated performance-per-cycle circumstances will perhaps get into a pretty pickle. For instance, the Intel Core i7-920 of the author doesn't even get 30 fps at max details in Full-HD despite a overclock to 3.8 GHz. And even our test PC, a Intel Core i7-4790 @ 4.5 Ghz has using DX11 one thread near maximum load. Admittedly it is possible to distribute the load a bit, if we reduce the resolution and anti-aliasing - the Haswell manages 120 fps in 720p - but each and every additional Megahertz expresses itself in additional fps even in 1080p with 4xMSAA.

          Enters AMDs low-level API Mantle. Especially impressive are the performance improvements of Mantle for old or weak CPUs like the author uses. In combination with a R9 290X can the aged Bloomfield gain 45% performance compared to DX11. That is the difference between a intolerable Stutterfest and an adequately fluid game experience. Even with a Core i7-4790K @ 4.5 Ghz the low-level API can gain 10% compared to the overhead-plagued microsoft API. Thus the R9 290x can clearly pull ahead of the much stronger overclocked GTX 980.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 8:49 AM

          FWIW, I can't say personally what it's like. I will say that this and AC:U ignites my never ending battles: Console (and which console) vs. PC (AND IF PC, getting a new graphics card -> AMD vs. Nvidia...) :)

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 7:08 AM

      Steven, can you tell us how long it took you to complete the game? Kevin VanOrd at GS said it took him 85 hours. I can totally see myself spending 100 hours on this with DLC. I am stoked!

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:10 AM

        Verge said 50hrs but that 100 was easily possible.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 7:27 AM

        It also took me about 85 hours, and that's with skipping a lot of the side quests to make the review deadline. If I had done them, it could have easily met 100 hours.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 7:31 AM

          Hot sassy molassy! I am fucking excited for this game!

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 7:31 AM

          Forgive me. I'm not reading the review because I'm spoiler sensitive on certain things. What did you play it on? I searched for Xbox, PS4 and PC and didn't get any hits. What were your thoughts on that (and others if you tried) systems?

          • reply
            November 11, 2014 9:15 AM

            I played it on the PC and switched between using mouse/kb controls and a gamepad.

            • reply
              November 11, 2014 9:17 AM

              Thanks! Given the sub discussion regarding performance, did you state what it was on, settings and what your overall impressions were regarding performance? Apologies again. :)

              • reply
                November 11, 2014 9:32 AM

                I did not comment on performance other than mentioning a few minor bugs I encountered. I'm using an Nvidia GTX 770 video card and ran the game on Ultra settings without seeing any major performance issues except for one instance when the game inexplicably laggy inside a small building. I restarted the game and the issue went away.

            • reply
              November 11, 2014 9:37 AM

              Which one did you prefer, in the end?

            • reply
              November 11, 2014 11:10 AM

              ANSWER ME, WONG

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 7:37 AM

          Yessss....

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 9:09 AM

          wowowow

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 9:11 AM

          Sweeeet

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 9:40 AM

          this is excellent news! the world and quests are varied enough to keep you interested. I'm totally ready to kill some fuckin' dragons.

          definitely been needing a skryim-esque long arc game. so many short game stints across so many games... ready to delve into one and really get my moneys worth.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 8:38 AM

        I'm not sure I care enough to play an RPG for 100 hours these days...

        There was some article about it awhile ago, but basically a single-player game over that length of time just feels like it's outstayed its welcome.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 8:46 AM

          I dunno. I've played 90+ hours of Skyrim over the years and I'm still not finished with it. I enjoy the world, so I keep playing. 40+ hours in Borderlands... (diff game, but...)

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 9:01 AM

          I find the opposite, personally. A 100+ hour game? I'll finish it, no problem. A 10-20 hour game? I'll get an hour in and never touch it again.

          • reply
            November 11, 2014 9:18 AM

            I'm known for playing 15 minutes into a game, meaning to get back to it and then forgetting about it until I have an urge to play it again. And then... Having to re-play the 15 minutes to get my bearings back.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 11:41 AM

          yeah I wanna play this, but damn, I don't think I could invest that kind of time in a single-player game anymore either

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 8:29 AM

      Man to buy this or not.. I mean I have SSO, Halo MCC already.. do I really have time for this toO!!!

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 8:30 AM

      Forget Ass Unity this is the game to get.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 8:38 AM

      Man... not sure if I can commit to a 75+ hour game :O

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 8:52 AM

      DA:I, FarCry4, and GTA V in one day. it's just too much. :(

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 8:58 AM

        Yeah that's nuts. I barely have time to play one game at a time.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 9:02 AM

        And then Smash Bros U three days later.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 9:17 AM

          Shit. Forgot about that

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 11:57 AM

          Smash Bros U is Thursday, isn't it?

          • reply
            November 11, 2014 12:16 PM

            It is Friday, in keeping with Nintendo's tradition of odd release days.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 9:10 AM

        srsly fuck

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 10:41 AM

        And WWE2k15

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 12:17 PM

        Also, LittleBigPlanet 3. Why Sony is just trotting that out there to die is beyond me.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 12:54 PM

          Man I was so pumped for lbp 1. Bought lbp 2 and barely played it. I could not be less excited for lbp 3.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 12:54 PM

          I'll be buying it, but I loved the level creator in the previous LBP games.

          Honestly I think they should make the LBP level creator and community levels free to spur the community, but I guess they need to make money somehow.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 3:14 PM

          I know, it looks amazing.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 11:58 AM

      Yo, steven wong, do you know if i should get the deluxe or the regular edition?

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 12:02 PM

        also i am kinda pissed that dragon age keep has not recorded most of my decisions.

        • reply
          November 11, 2014 1:48 PM

          Mine wouldn't import either. I had to go in and manually recreate everything. Then I made up shit that sounded good for DA2. My version of Hawke was pretty douchey.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 12:57 PM

      Ok fine I'll get it! Geeeeezzzaaaaaa...

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 1:33 PM

      how am I going to find the story if I didn't finish Origins (and don't remember what I did play) and skipped DA2?

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 1:42 PM

        Yeah I'm in this boat. I'm considering going back to beat DA:O, but I'd have to start over at this point. No time for that.

      • reply
        November 11, 2014 1:48 PM

        Read a wiki and then go to Dragon Age Keep website and setup a world state.

    • reply
      November 11, 2014 3:11 PM

      The lack of a sort of "Galactic Readiness" system ala ME3 is a huge plus in my opinion. You should not have to play the multiplayer — which by sheer coincidence is full of game mechanics designed to entice you to spend real money — in order to get the best possible ending to your single player campaign. And unfortunately on the PC version of ME3, the multiplayer is pretty much dead, and going at it solo is not fun.

      Not that there would be any problem with the single player and multiplayer being tied to each other in some other, non-intrusive way.

    • reply
      November 12, 2014 3:28 AM

      Anyone get Kaspersky to play nice with Origin? I want to get this game but I hate running my computer with AV off.

    • reply
      December 1, 2014 11:04 AM

      Almost 100hrs in. Just did the adamant main story quest. Still have the 30p Orlesian one to go, and everything after that + an area ive yet to even start.

      Loving the game.