Metro Redux restores both Metro 2033 and Last Light for PC, PS4, and Xbox One this summer

Metro Redux is a reality, re-building both Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light from the ground-up. In addition to massive upgrades, the two games will also allow players to play both games with the new Last Light improvements or in the vanilla style of 2033. Coming this summer to PC, PS4, and Xbox One either separately or as a tandem retail package.

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Deep Silver has formally pulled back the curtain on the long-rumored Metro Redux. However, while the original rumor suggested a collection of content from Metro: Last Light, the final product from 4A Games is proving to be far more than that. The full Metro Redux package will feature separate downloadable remasters of both Last Light and Metro 2033 for PC, PS4, and Xbox One, each going for $24.99. A boxed compilation will also be avaiable at retail for $49.99.

The remastered Metro 2033 and Last Light will both feature unreleased content and features, making them somewhat of a 'Director's Cut' of each game. They'll also both run at 1080p and 60fps, regardless of platform.

Metro 2033 has been rebuilt from the ground-up using Last Light's 4A Engine, which will add environments containing advanced lighting, dynamic weather effects, and improved animation. Cinematics and quick-time events have been rebuilt from scratch. The upgrades also extend beyond the game's visuals, overhauling the enemy AI and combat. Expect to see the 'mask wipe' mechanic make its debut in 2033, along with weapon customization and stealth mechanics.

Last Light will receive a similar graphical upgrade that includes new melee animations. The Last Light redux will also feature new 'Check Watch' and 'Check Inventory' features. In addition, the game's Season Pass content will all be included.

4A is also allowing players to select their specific play style. Those that appreciated the action-focused aesthetic of the newer Last Light will be able to take the 'Spartan' play style and set it for Metro 2033. Likewise, those that prefer the classic limited resources and slower reload speeds of 2033 will be able to play with the 'Survival' setting on the new Last Light. Each game will also feature Ranger Mode, for the masochists seeking a true challenge.

Metro Redux is set to release this summer. SteamOS and Linux versions are also expected later this year.

Senior Editor

Ozzie has been playing video games since picking up his first NES controller at age 5. He has been into games ever since, only briefly stepping away during his college years. But he was pulled back in after spending years in QA circles for both THQ and Activision, mostly spending time helping to push forward the Guitar Hero series at its peak. Ozzie has become a big fan of platformers, puzzle games, shooters, and RPGs, just to name a few genres, but he’s also a huge sucker for anything with a good, compelling narrative behind it. Because what are video games if you can't enjoy a good story with a fresh Cherry Coke?

From The Chatty
  • reply
    May 22, 2014 8:00 AM

    Ozzie Mejia posted a new article, Metro Redux restores both Metro 2033 and Last Light for PC, PS4, and Xbox One this summer.

    Metro Redux is a reality, re-building both Metro 2033 and Metro Last Light from the ground-up. In addition to massive upgrades, the two games will also allow players to play both games with the new Last Light improvements or in the vanilla style of 2033. Coming this summer to PC, PS4, and Xbox One either separately or as a tandem retail package.

    • reply
      May 22, 2014 8:03 AM

      While cool and all it's not like these games needed a graphical overhaul.

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        May 22, 2014 8:12 AM

        You're right but 2033 desperately needed a overhaul to its stealth and combat mechanics.

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      May 22, 2014 8:13 AM

      Sounds like a good deal for new players. I recently completed both games and LL especially was a graphical powerhouse. Fun too.

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      May 22, 2014 8:15 AM

      It seems odd that a game that I still can't run at full tilt at 60 fps is getting an "enhanced" version.

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      May 22, 2014 8:43 AM

      Rad I will pick it up for the PC for sure, the games where awesome already as is so making it even better is only icing on the cake.

      Hope they are making a new version after this.

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      May 22, 2014 11:26 AM

      Next Gen! Bet this bad boy runs at 1080p 60fps!

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        May 22, 2014 1:22 PM

        it does on PS4, Xbox one is 900p

      • reply
        May 22, 2014 2:15 PM

        At what FoV? I noticed that Thief runs at a very narrow FoV on PS4. On the PC version, one can adjust the FoV to ones liking.

        • reply
          May 22, 2014 4:48 PM

          Metro: Last Light had a painfully bad FOV. I think they eventually made it editable but it has to be done through .cfg editing or something wonky like that.

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      May 22, 2014 1:29 PM

      please to be giving a coupon on steam to owners of the previous games

      • reply
        May 22, 2014 5:43 PM

        This please

        • rms
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          May 23, 2014 5:18 AM

          I'm finishing up LL now. A full retail price re-release would be a really tough sell for me.

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      May 23, 2014 12:36 AM

      All the fights in both games were so boring, just walk long enough until you get into a large clearing or crossroads in the tunnel, then gates will close, and four to five waves of monsters or people will come running, then it's cool for another ten minutes.

      In Stalker you could be pursued by people or monsters into buildings, over hills, and in hiding places, opponents reacted to you wherever you were.

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        May 23, 2014 1:58 AM

        wat? My memory of combat in Metro 2033 is nothing like that.
        Specifically I remember sneaking through an enemy camp picking off dudes and trying to not get seen

        • rms
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          May 23, 2014 5:19 AM

          He's thinking more of LL

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            May 23, 2014 10:13 AM

            Bullshit for either 2033 or LL

            Sure you're not on substance?

            • rms
              reply
              May 23, 2014 11:32 AM

              eh? I'm thinking of the railcar ride in LL, where you get 3 maybe 4 distinct waves of watchmen at a few points along the track. This occurs before the Bandit level.

              Anyway, there's at least one thing about Metro's combat I preferred to LL, namely the throwing-knife animations, which are completely absent in LL, a crying shame, and immersion-breaking; I think the grenade ones are gone too, forget now. The takedown & mask-wiping are nice additions, but bring back the throwing-knife!!

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        May 23, 2014 4:19 AM

        Disagreed completely. I had a fucking blast in that game, both in stealth and all-out firefights.

        Agree with you on STALKER though, it's probably my favourite game of all time.

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        May 23, 2014 7:10 AM

        Oh man. This one game, it's so linear it's practically in a bunch of tunnels its disgusting, but this other game and I mean an identical one because, the setting has russian people right?? Anyway this other game has nodes and they're totally comparable because they both have russians and ak47s and monsters. But the one with nodes is soooooooo much better because I didn't specify which one of the node games I mean because, well, ambiguity? Anyway buildings and hills and monsters and idiots.

        • rms
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          May 23, 2014 3:15 PM

          This deserves a reply, if only to point out that -- although Stalker & Metro share a common ancestry, are made by many of the same team, have a similar cultural setting -- still the literary inspirations for the two series are very different. The Metro games have the Metro2033 novel, which I'm reading in-between LL game chapters, and the two (game & novel) narratives seem to go together well, both with a pretty clear end-state or question: What to do about Homo Novus? This is a more or less
          standard narrative structure where the hero is on a specific quest, describing his adventures along the way: pretty linear.

          Now consider STALKER and the original Strugatsky story Roadside Picnic. The whole narrative of Roadside Picnic is that there is no explanation for the phenomenon, there is no end-state: Humanity in The Zone is completely at a loss and floundering, at the best trying to incorporate the awful and inexplicable into what framework they know, with most teetering on the edge of despair or insanity. The STALKER games succeed pretty well in putting this goal-less wandering mind-set into game form, with factions fighting over control of the inexplicable artifacts, and trying to incorporate them into the human economy. It's not surprising the endings feel tacked on.

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