EA announces dozens of games going offline due to GameSpy closure

Electronic Arts has produced a lengthy list of games it plans to shut down after June 30, saying it has not come up with a solution to keep services running in the wake of the GameSpy closure.

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Electronic Arts announced a sizable list of games that will go offline after June 30, as a result of the GameSpy online services closure. Though it still says it is investigating "community-supported options," no official solution is in place yet for games like Battlefield 2, Battlefield 1942, and various Command & Conquer games.

"Since GameSpy’s announcement, our teams have been working to evaluate options to keep services up and running," the company stated in an update (via GameSpot). "Unfortunately, due to technical challenges and concerns about the player experience, we do not have a solution at this time. Online services for EA games on the GameSpy platform will be closed down at the end of June."

Many of the most popular and still-active games are for PC, but the listings show GameSpy's servers were used for games across platforms like PlayStation 2, Wii, and DS. You can check out the full list to see all of the games being shut down.

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  • reply
    May 12, 2014 7:00 AM

    Steve Watts posted a new article, EA announces dozens of games going offline due to GameSpy closure.

    Electronic Arts has produced a lengthy list of games it plans to shut down after June 30, saying it has not come up with a solution to keep services running in the wake of the GameSpy closure.

    • reply
      May 12, 2014 7:05 AM

      Terrible EA. Just Terrible.

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        May 12, 2014 7:19 AM

        More like Electric Assholes, am I right? LOL

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      May 12, 2014 7:27 AM

      Me and some LAN buddies still play AIX a couple of times a year (which uses Battlefield 2). Does this mean all that fun time is over?

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        May 12, 2014 7:31 AM

        No it's just the server browser which is powered by game spy

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      May 12, 2014 7:29 AM

      EA: It's In The Game Until It's Not

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      May 12, 2014 7:38 AM

      Seems like a good time for EA to whip through the financials of providing their own hosting. I would say, or let Steam do it, but EA's proven it won't give any business to Steam if it can be avoided. Because, EA is *NOT* about serving their customers. So, this is the end of those games.

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        May 12, 2014 7:57 AM

        It seems like Gamespy is pretty integral to at least some of those games (as in built into the game UI and stuff), so replacing it may actually be difficult. Who knows if the source code or anyone that even knows what it means is around. Also, the player base is probably miniscule, and the dev and QA efforts probably won't justify it considering that they probably won't see very many additional sales from the upgrade.

        Also, IDKWTF.

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          May 12, 2014 8:54 AM

          You right about it being a very low roi for having to go back to an old project like that. I only even thought about it because CoH did it. Doesn't seem to perform as well as the original servers, but the other piece of it was EA stepping up to do their own hosting. There's any number of reasons why they shouldn't; which is probably why they don't. But, it would allow them to compete even more against Steam.

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            May 12, 2014 9:03 AM

            EA does their own hosting or at least control the backend for their more modern games. BF4 won't suddenly lose online play because a middleware provider takes their ball and goes home.

            All the games involved are either WAY old or developed by third parties (Crysis, Bulletstorm).

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      May 12, 2014 7:39 AM

      What was the point of giving away BF1942 for free last month if they were just going to give players the middle finger the next month? I don't know much about networking, but is there a way that people will be able to trick some of these games that have LAN support into thinking they are on a LAN so that online play is still possible, albeit without the matchmaking?

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        May 12, 2014 8:22 AM

        I'm pretty sure you can still use a connect command in the console or through a command line parameter (like what all seeing eye does)

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        May 12, 2014 8:59 AM

        Gamespy only announced their shutting down a month ago. All of this is due to Gamespy closing up shop. It's not like anyone could really predict this would happen.

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          May 12, 2014 9:06 AM

          Pretty sure my boss would fire me if I didn't have an escape plan when we are dependent on a 3rd party service for the use of our product and that 3rd party died.

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            May 12, 2014 9:10 AM

            Maybe they did have one and it was deemed not worthwhile for the return they would get.

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              May 12, 2014 9:52 AM

              You mean that whole online service they already have? True, it probably wasn't worth it.

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                May 12, 2014 10:27 AM

                It is not like they can just pop Origin into these games with five minutes of work.

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                  May 12, 2014 10:32 AM

                  Nope. I'm only being hard on them because it seems like a bit of poor decision making from the top a long way back.

                  As a player I could have told you 15 years ago that gamespy wasn't going to last and if I were making a game, I wouldn't have used it. I'm sure they saw it too, but thought that planned obselesence was a valid road. Maybe it was, I'm not EA.

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                    May 12, 2014 12:35 PM

                    Also keep in mind that the top of EA from a long way back isn't there anymore. John Riccitiello resigned last March, but also most of the Origin stuff was only spun up in the past 3 years, and EA by and large seemed to be far more concerned with getting upcoming PC titles released on Steam than they were with bringing legacy third-party matchmaking titles onto Origin.

                    And of course Steam is not an option because "Not Invented Here" / "Dogfooding" / insert your favorite corporate anti-pattern here.

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                  May 12, 2014 6:42 PM

                  No, but at the same time other companies have been transitioning their older games to Steamworks without it being cost-prohibitive. 2K, Bohemia, and Capcom all have confirmed specific games being switched to Steamworks.

                  I could understand EA not bothering for 10+ year old titles, but converting NONE of their games? That's just cold. Especially since some originally came out as recently as 2011.

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          May 12, 2014 9:58 AM

          Okay, so it's less EA bring dicks and more GameSpy dropping the ball. Hopefully he follows through and finds a way to keep matchmaking going for at least some of the bigger titles.

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        May 12, 2014 9:10 AM

        Here, this will be useless in a couple of months, but you should enjoy some free time with it.

        Ugh, fuck you for giving me free stuff that won't work forever!

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          May 12, 2014 9:12 AM

          also, who on here really really played it after they gave it away? i know i loaded it up and found a server, marveled at how far games have come, and quit after 20 minutes.

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          May 12, 2014 9:59 AM

          I already had it installed and play it every once in awhile, so it doesn't affect me, but I feel bad for people who may have gotten into it for the first time after the giveaway.

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        May 12, 2014 9:25 AM

        Good on them! That's awesome.

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      May 12, 2014 9:05 AM

      What a wasted opportunity. This a great opening to grow Origin, and they are letting it pass them by.

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        May 12, 2014 9:15 AM

        do you have any idea how much time and money would take to get developers to get inside each one of those games and change them without breaking something else?

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          May 12, 2014 9:56 AM

          It would be an immense undertaking. That does not meant that the opportunity is not being wasted.

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            May 12, 2014 9:56 AM

            what opportunity, exactly? i'm curious as to the benefit of resurrecting these 10, 12, 14 year-old games.

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              May 12, 2014 11:00 AM

              I see it similarly to Nintendo's Virtual Console.

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                May 12, 2014 2:05 PM

                I think there is a divide between the games Nintendo made and are offering on VC, and the ones we're looking at here.

                A game like let's say Link to the Past is a very confined experience. You don't need any other back end or a community to support it. If you played it then, you'd have roughly the same exact experience now barring the controller and video screen. Not only that, Nintendo is selling these games to old as well as new players. On the flip side, the online portion of Battle Field requires that there be actual players there to support it, and there's no guarantee that over time those people will be there to play it, and I could see EA making an argument that whatever community is there is pretty small, and it's not like any money can be recouped for the amount of work put forth to get the servers up. The best we can hope for and what will likely happen is that talented members of that community will get things up and running with hack.

                Because of online I don't view a lot of modern games in the same light. Their shelf life is fleeting. You can't plug up your Xbox Classic hop on LIVE and play Halo 2. Even if you have the disc, that experience is gone. If you weren't there tough. You missed out. Maybe you can buy the re release and get some joy out of that bastardized version. It's the same for games like Dark Souls. Leaving messages on the ground, being invaded, or watching the ghost reel of someone's death. It's very likely the servers won't be around in the future, and a portion if not the game entirely will be lost.

                As I look at my 360 I don't see a lot of games I wish to go back and play, largely because the one's I would don't really have the community anymore, and unlike my SNES I'm sure that 20 years from now I couldn't just load up Mass Effect 3 and really enjoy it. Especially if I don't have MY specific Xbox hard drive in working order with all my saves. How well does ME play without the day one patch? How's the multiplayer without the servers? Or how fun would Burnout Paradise be without 5 other player cars causing chaos?

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                  May 12, 2014 2:28 PM

                  It's not a perfect comparison, but the underlying idea is the same: you are trying to get people to buy into a platform (Nintendo or Origin). You have games they like that they may not be able to play any more. You use these games to pull people onto your platform.

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                    May 12, 2014 4:34 PM

                    I could see that working. May even work for them to offer access to their large back catalog through a sub similar to PS+. People seem to really go for that.

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              May 12, 2014 7:02 PM

              Not all the affected games are that old. Crysis 2 came out in 2011, and Crysis Warhead came out in 2008. Crysis and C&C3 came out in 2007.

              Independent of any of that though, EA's announcement even admits that many of these games still have active multiplayer communities, explicitly mentioning C&C and Battlefield. Clearly they know that these games are still played and would still be a draw if they were transitioned to another service, and yet are choosing not to act on that.

              Now again, I'm not saying it would be completely easy, but at the same time other companies are transitioning older games from GameSpy to other services, more than one even. Clearly they think there's money to be made there, and yet EA can't find a single game worth salvaging? This is my skeptical face.

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      May 12, 2014 9:07 AM

      literally dozens of gamers will be affected

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        May 12, 2014 9:48 AM

        "It was as if the voices of tens of people screamed out. Then were suddenly silenced. I fear something trivial has happened."

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      May 12, 2014 9:08 AM

      So they gave away Battlefield 1942, just in time to shut it down?
      I guess that's something.

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        May 12, 2014 10:32 AM

        I believe you can still host private 1942 servers.

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      May 12, 2014 9:22 AM

      How dare they take off Nascar Thunder 2004!!!

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      May 12, 2014 10:31 AM

      we should have a bf1942 shackbattle sendoff. even if we technically could have one after gamespy shutters

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      May 12, 2014 11:50 AM

      Does this break the DRM for single player?

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      May 12, 2014 12:32 PM

      Sheesh, why don't they just give these games to the GameRanger guy? http://www.gameranger.com/

    • Zek legacy 10 years
      reply
      May 12, 2014 12:38 PM

      This sort of thing is always solved by the community if there's a demand. Thing is, there almost never is.

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        May 12, 2014 7:08 PM

        GameRanger, Tunngle, and Evolve all frown on your shenanigans. So do the new Tribes Master Servers.

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      May 12, 2014 4:46 PM

      gentlemen, I do not want to say I told you so because I never did, but I always knew this would happen.

      Some day this will happen with steam too and we all will be very sad.
      That being said, PC games really need to keep LAN multiplayer or let the communities host their own stuff for new games.
      The fact that we can still host our own quake servers give those old games longevity and allows the gamers to decide whether we should continue playing these games or not is the right thing.

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        May 12, 2014 6:21 PM

        There have been a few things like this over the past year, and it's honestly soured me on Digital distribution in general. I have pretty large libraries on Steam and Xbox Live, but I have been shunning those platforms for months because of this.

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        May 12, 2014 6:46 PM

        when steam goes away you can't play those games anyways who cares about Lan support?

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          May 12, 2014 7:07 PM

          If Steam goes away while it's still under Gaben's control I wouldn't be surprised if there's a final "offline mode for everything forever" patch released prior to the shutdown.

          Even outside of that, LAN mode means your ability to play multiplayer is only dependent on you and who you want to play with, rather than an outside service. I dunno if you've been paying attention recently, but Steam has been dropping out for 5-10 minutes here and there a lot lately. What if there were more disruptions? What if Steam was unavailable for hours at a time? If your game has a LAN option you and a friend can just use a VPN service and play that way without interruption. Without a LAN option you're completely at the mercy of Steam's servers. Yeah, they're reliable now, but who knows what the future will hold.

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            May 12, 2014 7:14 PM

            I don't know. Steam was always about providing a license to access games, not any actual ownership of them

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              May 12, 2014 7:46 PM

              That's mostly been up to the individual game company, not Valve. By and large most of the games you buy on Steam have the same EULA you would find on a Retail version.

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            May 12, 2014 7:57 PM

            That'll still mean all Steamworks titles will presumably have broken multiplayer and whatever else they relied on.

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      May 12, 2014 7:05 PM

      These kind of surprised me by even being mentioned: Master of Orion III for PC,
      Medal of Honor: Allied Assault for PC and Mac

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