Zelda Wii U Producer Says The Game Will Offer 'Something New'

I hope it's as different as Majora's Mask.

15

Eiji Aonuma, the producer of the upcoming untitled Legend of Zelda title for Wii U, says the title has "really taken shape." He hopes that Nintendo hopes to deliver "something new" and to attempt to do so Aonuma and his team have tried to channel Ocarina of Time as "the base of our secret sauce."

What kind of secret sauce? Let's hope it's not just rebranded Mac Sauce, like so many of the other Zelda titles. They're still fun, but missing that certain something Majora's Mask had. 

Details are still scarce on the title, and only the vague release date of "sometime in 2016" has been revealed. Hopefully, we'll get something on Zelda Wii U at E3 this June, but with Nintendo's sometimes erratic info drops, you can never be too sure.

Senior Editor

Fueled by horror, rainbow-sugar-pixel-rushes, and video games, Brittany is a Senior Editor at Shacknews who thrives on surrealism and ultraviolence. Follow her on Twitter @MolotovCupcake and check out her portfolio for more. Like a fabulous shooter once said, get psyched!

From The Chatty
  • reply
    March 10, 2016 12:45 PM

    Brittany Vincent posted a new article, Zelda Wii U Producer Says The Game Will Offer 'Something New'

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 3:25 PM

      I think the best thing they could do is give Link a voice. Thoughts, opinions. Let the hero of time have character development.

      • reply
        March 10, 2016 3:55 PM

        Here's what I think about Link having a voice in games other than action noises.

        No.

        Not having a voice makes it so you give Link your voice. He becomes an extension of yourself. It's much easier to immerse yourself in a voiceless character than one that already has a voice actor and personality. That's why Gordon Freeman is so successful. Because YOU are the Freeman. That's why Zelda is such an iconic franchise, because YOU are Link.

        • reply
          March 10, 2016 3:57 PM

          there're endless counterexamples to this concept in games as well as every other medium

          • reply
            March 10, 2016 4:07 PM

            OK. I'm still a big fan of voiceless protagonists in video games.

            • reply
              March 10, 2016 4:10 PM

              the more dialog and character you add to NPCs the more jarring it gets to have a silent protagonist, and the harder it is to have it feel like an interactive conversation rather than constant monologues (especially if you have actual cutscenes). Franchises like Dragon Age and Fallout have learned this most recently.

              • reply
                March 10, 2016 4:11 PM

                Obviously the concept works better in some genres and not so much in others.

        • reply
          March 10, 2016 4:14 PM

          By not having a voice he is no one. There's no character development. He's just a vehicle for you to drive around. Since the game Ocarina of Time Nintendo has been trying to make this series story driven, and it falls flat in a lot of ways because the main character is just an empty husk. Weather he speaks, or it's just text, he has to say something to convey personality.

          One of the bigger things people remember about Wind Waker is how expressive Link is. He almost responds to things. His eyes convey personality. There's humor, shock, sadness. He has the under pinning of personality in that game. Having this silent hero for 60 hours in a game that's suppose to be story driven doesn't do well for character development. You're suppose to have a hero that grows and changes over the course of this lengthy quest, and he's exactly the same in the beginning, as he is in the end, no wiser for all the challenges. He's just better equipped for all of them. It's ridiculous for a modern game, and this seemingly simple change opens up so much more for story telling.

          As it is now the games just play like the most base MMOs. You go to the quest giver, get the quest, do the quest, return to quest giver. There's no insight, and no development. Which is fine to some extent, but these games try to build out it's world and story in such a way that it needs more. Zelda's Mechanics have pretty much always been solid. The story has always been shallow. To improve that element you need an actual character. Not a paper doll.

          You the player grows, which is important and really well done, but not having a strong character weakens the game over all, and limits the type of game you can make. In all the Zelda games Link is pretty much a n00b in a world he's always lived in. How about he kinda knows some shit for once? Not in the Samus "Oh no all my powers are gone" way. But in the I've lived my whole life in the desert, I know how to survive here, but now he's in the mountains and is out of his element. How does that change the character. Is he shaken by it? Is he more cautious? There's just so much there to work with. But no. He just says nothing, and there's only the visuals and puzzles to work with. So instead of story the game must rely on a new gimmick to separate itself from the last one.

        • reply
          March 11, 2016 3:51 AM

          I've never really been convinced by this argument about silent protagonists. It's the video game equivalent of the wish-fulfillment audience surrogate narrator in books like Twilight. It's definitely a successful device with broad appeal, but it's pretty boring. I can only speak for myself of course but being able to imagine myself in Link's shoes has literally nothing to do with why I've enjoyed any of the Zelda games.

          Also in Freeman's case the weird monologue-conversations all the real characters have with him in HL2 is the most immersion-killing shit ever are you kidding me

      • reply
        March 10, 2016 4:17 PM

        [deleted]

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 3:29 AM

        If I'm honest I'm not really opposed to it, but: I don't think protagonist character depth relates to what's interesting about Zelda, or what's become stale about it, and even if they did attempt it I don't think Nintendo has the writing chops to not fuck it up anyway.

        • reply
          March 11, 2016 3:31 PM

          I don't think Nintendo quite has the talent either, but there's very little they can do to that game that would be a surprise. If the big secret is that the world is large and expansive, don't all Zelda games emulate that in some capacity, in which case what does that change?

          If it's just new spins on old puzzles I'll find that less impressive.

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 4:19 AM

        Only if they get the jerk from the 90's cartoon to return to voice him

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 4:03 PM

      [deleted]

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 4:25 PM

      This game will not have a single new thing.

      --No PR person ever.

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 4:26 PM

      Really? OMG I would have never guessed!

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 8:08 PM

      [deleted]

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 8:10 PM

      Crafting system.

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 8:13 PM

      No shit?!

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 8:16 PM

      Outfit DLC.

    • reply
      March 10, 2016 8:24 PM

      tingle butt plug

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 4:19 AM

        Wouldn't even have to change the shape. He's right out of the box.

    • reply
      March 11, 2016 3:55 AM

      Basically it's going to be cyberpunk dark souls but with Zelda characters.

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 4:19 AM

        Are we complaining if that's the case? Because I am so down for that.

    • reply
      March 11, 2016 5:38 AM

      Doesn't need a voice. In fact the Zelda games need less of a story. The last few games have added a ton of completely useless story that just padded the completion time. Skyward Sword was super bad about this.

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 6:21 AM

        I liked the added story actually. I found it pretty interesting to see through to the end.

        • reply
          March 11, 2016 6:23 AM

          My biggest problem was how slow the dialog is in the Zelda games and that you can't skip it. The story itself was interesting but had a lot of fluff. The worst was really the tutorial area. It was just plain too long.

          • reply
            March 11, 2016 6:54 AM

            I can agree with that. The start of zelda games has gotten entirely too long. I really enjoy Twilight Princess once it gets going but the start of it is a slog.

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 6:43 AM

        I don't think they need less story, but they need to be classier about presenting it. Backing up the dialogue dumptruck isn't an interesting way to convey it, especially when your dude is a weird voiceless doll boy. Zelda used to be good at this, even - Majora's Mask had some wonderfully quiet storytelling that the series (and really Nintendo in general) has just forgotten how to handle.

      • reply
        March 11, 2016 3:36 PM

        And that's fine. If they zap out the story and go more toward a Link to the Past style that's cool, but I can't see them doing that. So expect characters you love or hate to vomit monologue at you while you click the next button.

    • reply
      March 11, 2016 6:04 AM

      You have to buy a new amiibo to access each dungeon

    • reply
      March 11, 2016 4:57 PM

      Ocarina of Time's big surprise was when he traveled through time and became adult Link. Majora's Mask was that time would restart over and over, I believe every 3 days. Hmmmm

Hello, Meet Lola