Welcome to the New Shacknews

You're currently viewing the beginning of a full site renovation for Shacknews.com. You might find something working oddly. If you do, let us know! More exciting new features to follow.

Epic launches Seattle studio to push Unreal Engine 4 development

Epic Games has announced the formation of an as-of-yet unnamed Seattle studio that will focus further developing Unreal Engine 4 technology, and they are hiring.

8

Epic Games has announced the formation of an as-of-yet unnamed Seattle studio that will focus on further developing Unreal Engine 4 technology. The studio is hiring, looking in particular for senior-level people with experience in online game services and infrastructure.

"The proximity to key partners, the density of world-class talent and all the factors that make Seattle an attractive place to live convinced us that it is the perfect locale for Epic's West Coast operation," said Epic Games President Dr. Michael Capps in a release. "We are looking to hire even more of the best engineers around to contribute to Unreal Engine 4, which we believe is set to change the way we all make games."

The name of the studio and the leadership team "soon," Epic said, but the company has already posted job listings.

Epic took the wraps off Unreal Engine 4 at E3. Fortnite is the first game using the engine. You can check out the snazzy E3 UE4 demo below.

Contributing Editor

From The Chatty

  • reply
    September 6, 2012 11:30 AM

    John Keefer posted a new article, Epic launches Seattle studio to push Unreal Engine 4 development.

    Epic Games has announced the formation of an as-of-yet unnamed Seattle studio that will focus further developing Unreal Engine 4 technology, and they are hiring.

    • reply
      September 6, 2012 11:44 AM

      "online services infrastructure"? Is this for cloud services for Unreal Engine devs, and/or a gamer-facing service to challenge Steam?

    • reply
      September 6, 2012 11:54 AM

      Proximity to key partners = Valve?

      • reply
        September 6, 2012 11:58 AM

        I suppose they be referring to M$ as well :/

        • reply
          September 6, 2012 12:17 PM

          Epic's had a cozy business relationship with MGS for years, and used GFWL for Bulletstorm, whereas in terms of the relationship with Valve, Steam is mentioned as the default online service in the Unreal SDK, though Epic themselves haven't made use of it, except perhaps for selling old PC games in their back-catalogue.

          I anticipate that Fortnite will require its own login to a proprietary backend, and not Steam. The infrastructure they reference in this press release may be that backend. Epic probably wants more control than Valve is willing to offer via Steam, and even though Epic and Valve partner in some ways, this seems like a case of Epic wanting to channel money to infrastructure investment, instead of checks to pay Steam service licensing fees.

          • reply
            September 6, 2012 11:17 PM

            You're thinking present day, but what about 5-10 years from now? Steam will be even bigger than it is now, and we may be using it on Valve's own hardware. Epic would be crazy not to use Steam as the platform for Fortnite. After all, they're not Blizzard.



      • reply
        September 6, 2012 12:17 PM

        Makes sense if you think Valve is going to abandon source for UE4...

        • reply
          September 6, 2012 12:19 PM

          No; Valve wants to go after OS X and Linux gaming. Except for the iOS efforts, Epic has been solidly D3D since 2004.

          • reply
            September 6, 2012 3:00 PM

            Mostly but not quite. Epic has version of Unreal Engine 3.x running in Flash 11.3.

            • reply
              September 6, 2012 5:34 PM

              True, they use OpenGL where they have to, but ever since the year or two before UT2003 released, they were preferring D3D, even to the point where they recommended the D3D renderer for UT99 (despite Dan Vogel's OpenGL renderer running faster, with almost exactly the same functionality, and far less input lag).

      • reply
        September 6, 2012 3:03 PM

        A partnership can mean anything. It can mean a distribution deal, software licensing, or integration of features. I am leaning more to side of them making it easy for developers to integrate steamworks in to their games.

    • reply
      September 6, 2012 12:07 PM

      Dandy, a bunch of people out there were recently fired in gaming so hopefully it pulls some of them in.

    • reply
      September 6, 2012 12:55 PM

      Very cool

    • reply
      September 7, 2012 1:18 AM

      Given the recent layoffs in that area, I'm sure they won't have any problems filling those jobs.