Sony confirms 'Online Pass' for Resistance 3

Sony has confirmed that Resistance 3 will include an Online Pass voucher to access online features, similar to programs instituted by EA and THQ. The statement also implies more first-party Online Pass games could be on the way.

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Following rumors sparked by a German Resistance 3 bundle, Sony has confirmed that the game will include a one-time use code to access online features. We've seen Sony dip a toe in this pool before on the PSP, with online entitlements offered for games like ModNation Racers. This new statement seems like Sony is ramping up its efforts and bringing Online Passes to the PlayStation 3, where they've become commonplace in games from EA and THQ.

In a statement issued today, Sony said:

We are always evaluating new programs for our online offering, and starting with Resistance 3 this September, we will be instituting a network pass program for PS3 games with online capabilities. This program will be game-specific. Games that are a part of this program will include a single-use registration code that grants the account holder redeeming the code full online access for that title. This is an important initiative as it allows us to accelerate our commitment to enhancing premium online services across our first party game portfolio.

The program will be "game-specific," so we may not see it for other online-enabled first-party games like Uncharted 3: Drake's Deception. Then again, the statement refers to "starting with Resistance 3," so it definitely seems like there are more games with an Online Pass code to come.

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From The Chatty
  • reply
    July 6, 2011 12:30 PM

    Steve Watts posted a new article, Sony confirms 'Online Pass' for Resistance 3.

    Sony has confirmed that Resistance 3 will include an Online Pass voucher to access online features, similar to programs instituted by EA and THQ. The statement also implies more first-party Online Pass games could be on the way.

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      July 6, 2011 12:59 PM

      So let me get this straight and down to bare tacks. Basically, they are creating an ability to keep you from selling your purchased game as used? That's all I am getting from this so forgive me if I am completely wrong. On a side note, I am disappointed that I cannot play R3 because I got rid of my PS3 and am done with consoles. However, R1 and R2 were some of the best story telling and action games. I wish they would make a PC version non-ported.

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        July 6, 2011 1:01 PM

        Most games with stuff like this let you buy the pass for a used copy of the game for around $10.

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          July 6, 2011 1:13 PM

          Yeah for all of the attempts being made to curve used game sales, this strategy isn't the worst one as long as you can buy a used copy online pass. Rather than try and stop used game sales, this strategy just allows for publishers to get a piece of the used sale transaction.

          I really have no problem with this, especially if the publishers themselves are the ones fronting the bill for servers to run these games.

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            July 6, 2011 1:19 PM

            This use of a pass for online access is more about preventing Copied games not used games.

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              July 6, 2011 1:35 PM

              I didn't know that modded consoles could access Live or PSN.

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              July 6, 2011 2:07 PM

              Nope. It's all about capturing part of the used sale in situations where they're footing the bill for dedicated servers.

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      July 6, 2011 1:18 PM

      Anyone remember the promise of DLC? "Keep getting new content for your games you already own!" "New campaigns! New single player levels!" "More maps, mods, and things that PC users have been using for years!" "Mod makers' finest will now show up on consoles!" "We can patch in new features!"

      And what have we gotten? The ability for game makers to reduce the value of used titles by removing features. The ability for game makers to rely on patching games on day 1 rather than actually finish their title. Game makers holding back content that they WOULD have put on the game and that is actually on the disc so they can "monetize" it by selling it on day 1. Game makers using DLC as a way to sell their titles at one store vs another, reducing actual price competition and value to the consumer.

      Just goes to show you. Anything that sounds great and IS great for PC users can be twisted and turned into another way to make money on consoles (ie., online play, DLC, beta's, demo's).

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        July 6, 2011 1:20 PM

        I have to agree.

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        July 6, 2011 1:21 PM

        actually the original promises you listed have all been kept. DLC varies greatly depending on publisher.

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        July 6, 2011 3:06 PM

        You're ignoring the part where we also got new content for games we already own, new campaigns, new single player levels, more maps, mods, features, etc. And they're not removing any features in this case, they're helping to fund the dedicated servers for the games since Gamestop and it's fellow pawn shops have built a business model around screwing devs/publishers. If you buy the game used and find that you want to use the multiplayer component, you pay a few bucks to do so. Absolutely nothing wrong with that, and you get the added satisfaction of knowing the dev/publisher is getting compensated for their hard work! :D

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      July 6, 2011 1:52 PM

      This is kind kind of what PC games is, no?

      Take Starcraft 2 for example. Can you buy a used copy with the serial and use it on a new account? My guess is no. When you use the code you add the game to your battlenet account and cant sell it.

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        July 6, 2011 3:59 PM

        Yup, CD keys, activation DRM, and/or online authentication lock-in. Welcome to our hell, console gamers!

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      July 6, 2011 2:23 PM

      this is just about all they can do to protect paying customers from the pirates and cheaters =\

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      July 6, 2011 2:38 PM

      Well, just means that instead of buying it used, I'll buy it when it starts getting discounted.

      My price limit is around $40, which means I buy it used or I buy it when it goes on sale. Either way, they won't get top dollar from me,

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      July 6, 2011 3:14 PM

      It becomes way more expensive to rent a game you only wanted to play online. Oh well.

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        July 6, 2011 3:21 PM

        They'll probably have some sort of trial period like EA's method. Or you can do what I'll do, and just use a friend's PSN account who's bought the game and play til my heart's content.

        Unless earning trophies for your account is your sort of deal, then you'll have to get your own code. :/

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      July 6, 2011 3:34 PM

      The online pass system is the fairest anyone has come up with as yet. Used games can still change hands and the developer can still get paid for a new purchase. If only they could do this with books.

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      July 6, 2011 5:31 PM

      "This is an important initiative as it allows us to accelerate our commitment to enhancing premium online services across our first party game portfolio."

      Marketing jargon achievement unlocked!


      So if I can attempt to break this down:

      - Important Initiative (to who?) "as it allows us" (oh to Sony, not me)
      - Accelerated commitment (that sounds exciting! what are you committing to?) "to enhancing premium online services" (minimizing hacking I'd have to guess? a vulnerable network surely can be corrected in a way without harming the consumer can't it?)
      - First party portfolio (so this will only be on Sony published titles? promise?)


      We've reached an age where appeal to the shareholder has overtaken priority to treat the consumer as though they matter. I can picture a table full of wealthy suits wanting answers as to why they didn't sell another million copies and someone suggesting finding a way to keep used game sales from cutting into their profits as being the solution.

      Tell you what Sony, I'll spend my gaming buck elsewhere. This sort of things flies on PC with consumers because of better pricing, unlimited downloads (aka convenience) and lack of subscription fees to use multiplayer. If you want your console to be OnLive, then go buy them, but this isn't what I signed up for.

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        July 6, 2011 6:13 PM

        We reached that age in the 80s.

        "We've reached an age where appeal to the shareholder has overtaken priority to treat the consumer as though they matter. I can picture a table full of wealthy suits wanting answers as to why they didn't sell another million copies and someone suggesting finding a way to keep used game sales from cutting into their profits as being the solution. "

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      July 6, 2011 11:16 PM

      Are you sure it doesn't have only one save game that burns itself to the disc and can't be reset? Jesus Christ on a cracker...

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      July 7, 2011 12:19 PM

      As long as the code can be bought a la carte, I am fine with this. On a side note, I am curious if eventually distributors will sell multiplayer functionality itself as DLC. Too many games have wasted development hours on poorly thought-out multiplayer experiences that cost games a potentially better, stronger single-player experiences (Bioshock 2 and Metroid Prime 2 say "hi").

      It may be a better model to focus on selling a strong single-player product (maybe only charging $45-$50?) and then adding an optional multi-player DLC.

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