L.A. Noire to be featured at Tribeca Film Festival

Rockstar Games announced today that L.A. Noire will be an Official Selection at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival. The company will host a preview and Q&A regarding its cinematic qualities.

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Rockstar has a penchant for publishing cinematic games, but today the company announced its next game will be featured at an actual cinema festival. L.A. Noire will be an Official Selection at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival, marking the first time the event has honored a video game.

As part of the Tribeca Talks series, Rockstar will preview the game for the Tribeca audience on April 25. They'll show a "live interactive" case, and then host a Q&A session moderated by Tribeca Chief Creative Officer Geoff Gilmore, about the cross-pollination of film and video games.

"We're thrilled that L.A. Noire is being recognized by the Tribeca Film Festival this way," said Rockstar founder Sam Houser in the announcement. "It's a real honor, and another step forward for interactive entertainment."

The Tribeca Film Festival runs from April 20 to May 1 in New York City. This will be the event's 10th anniversary.

More and more it seems like publisher Take-Two is just a hair away from producing movies. And why not? It worked out so well for Square.

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From The Chatty
  • reply
    March 29, 2011 11:30 AM

    Comment on L.A. Noire to be featured at Tribeca Film Festival, by Steve Watts.

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      March 29, 2011 11:38 AM

      in before games aren't art

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      March 29, 2011 12:27 PM

      Summary: Rockstar Games announced today that L.A. Noire will be an Official Selection at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival. The company will host a preview and Q&A regarding its cinematic qualities.

    • reply
      March 29, 2011 12:45 PM

      [deleted]

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        March 29, 2011 1:04 PM

        Did you guys miss the part where Ebert flat out tells us that he thinks most films aren't art? Hence, Ebert might consider most, if not all, the films at Tribeca Film Festival not art.

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          March 29, 2011 1:37 PM

          So is his stance basiclaly "Bad art isn't art?"

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            March 29, 2011 1:54 PM

            Ebert's definition of art isn't the same as yours, hence it's easy to frame his opinion in a dismissive and insulting manner like you're doing right now, but Ebert's opinion is important because he's an expert in one field of art. Not just an expert, but one our most well known and most widely read experts today.

            I'm not going to argue or explain Ebert's position because someone has spent far time and explained it in far more eloquent manner than I could (Haxim links it below as well):
            http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/33462/Opinion_Brian_Moriartys_Apology_For_Roger_Ebert.php

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              March 29, 2011 2:20 PM

              I wasn't framing it in a dismissive and insulting manner. I was actually asking.

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                March 29, 2011 2:22 PM

                In that case, just read Moriarty's GDC talk I linked above. It's quite well thought through.

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              March 29, 2011 2:29 PM

              "Video game products contain plenty of art, but it's product art, which is to say, kitsch art.
              Kitsch art is not bad art. It's commercial art. Art designed to be sold, easily and in quantity. And the bigger the audience, the kitschier it's gonna get.
              Kitsch is a risk-reduction strategy, time-tested and good for business.
              Kitsch is robust. Details of execution don't matter very much. You can change stuff without affecting its utility."

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                March 29, 2011 2:36 PM

                The article made it brutally clear that Ebert does not consider kitsch to be art. That's the last time I'm visiting this thread.

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                  March 29, 2011 2:46 PM

                  !! I was just linking an interesting tidbit I read in that link you posted. Also, this links in with the gamification thread:
                  "Gameflow is work made fun! Flow keeps you joyfully working, even in your free time!
                  Gameflow will be the harness of the New Labor class."

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                March 29, 2011 7:36 PM

                I think this could easily be said of most games, but I have a harder time dismissing something like, say, ICO in this manner

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              March 29, 2011 6:29 PM

              he missed a big point. many modern video games downplay the aspect of challenge and learning most attributed to traditional games in favor of an immersive experience more directed towards exploration of a place and story

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                March 29, 2011 6:47 PM

                But then that immersion is ruined for me when those games go into cutscenes and poorly try to emulate movies.

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              March 29, 2011 7:52 PM

              The biggest problem I have is with one of Ebert's main points when he argues that they, by definition, cannot be art due to player choices negating authorial control. An argument could very much be made for that to apply to a game like Garry's Mod or Minecraft, but not to most modern games. Authorial control abounds in almost every modern game. Most don't really require player choices.

              Also, a museum could house an installation where patrons are given a basic toolset and asked to create. I think this would be widely regarded as "art."

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        March 29, 2011 2:33 PM

        [deleted]

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      March 29, 2011 1:14 PM

      Before we get too crazy on art/not art/Ebert bashing I'd suggest everone take the time to read Brian Moriarty's talk from GDC: http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/33462/Opinion_Brian_Moriartys_Apology_For_Roger_Ebert.php

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        March 29, 2011 1:17 PM

        I read that from Remo's stream and it was a rather insightful talk.

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        March 29, 2011 7:19 PM

        I should write up my Ico is Art (with a Capital A) essay some time. It is a game that transcends its media and genre and has influence outside of gaming. Even Guillermo del Toro cites it as part of his influence on his directing tastes.

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          March 29, 2011 7:39 PM

          You totally should and then post it here. I approve of anything that brings more attention to that game.

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          March 29, 2011 7:49 PM

          I fucking love that game, and SotC as well.

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          March 30, 2011 4:25 AM

          It's one of the top contenders for the games as "art" argument, that's for sure.

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      March 29, 2011 2:34 PM

      I was playing Mafia 2 over the weekend and the girlfriend commented that she was enjoying the storyline. Later on she asked "what is this movie called again? ... I mean game?"

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      March 29, 2011 6:00 PM

      This games going to be like being in a movie! Really excited for this one...

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        March 29, 2011 6:29 PM

        I don't want games to try to be like movies though because they usually suck at it.

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          March 29, 2011 8:03 PM

          yeah, Metal Gear Solid 4 anyone?

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            March 30, 2011 6:19 AM

            You punks don't know anything for interactive movies. MGS4 is genius next to what they tried to pawn on us in the mid-90s.

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      March 30, 2011 5:22 AM

      This is where butthurt gamers bring up Ebert again. Hang on a minute...

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