Game and Film Incubator Radar Group Announced; Miller Claims Firm Is 'Desparately' Needed

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A number of game industry veterans have banded together to form Radar Group, a firm that describes itself an "entertainment entity to incubate, manage and produce Intellectual Properties for cross-media leveraging in video game and film markets."

Informally unveiled over the weekend, the company's roster includes 3D Realms co-founder Scott Miller, who will serve as chief creative officer, and FormGen co-founder Jim Perkins, who has been appointed CEO.

Radar noted that it will only work with original, not licensed, properties. The company currently has three projects in the works--Earth No More, Prey 2, and Incarnate--with two more unannounced projects in development.

In the film market, Radar has partnered with Depth Entertainment and its president Scott Faye. Faye is currently acting as the producer on the game-to-film adaptation of Max Payne, which stars Mark Wahlberg and Mila Kunis.

"We promise that Uwe Boll will never direct one of our movies," Miller vowed on his blog, which noted his belief that "too many financial execs [are] leading inherently creative businesses" and that the used game market is hurting developers.

"We're something our industry desperately needs," he explained in today's announcement. "Radar is teaming up with many of the industry's top independent studios to help them create original IP in which they own a substantial ownership stake.

"In today's industry it's nearly impossible, unless you're Epic or Valve, to create original games and not give away full IP ownership to the publisher," Miller continued. "Radar believes that creators should share ownership, and all of the long-term benefits that come from that."

On his blog, Miller also touched briefly on Radar's approach to game and film production.

"Radar does more than develop a game concept, we also develop a deep storyverse," he wrote. "This storyverse is rich and broad, full of characters and story possibilities ... Three of the best storyverses are Star Wars, Harry Potter, and Lord of the Rings.

"While it's nearly impossible to create storyverses this rich time and time again," Miller admitted, "at least we attempt to think in terms of the big picture, so that our properties have a history, and more importantly, a future."

From The Chatty
  • reply
    March 18, 2008 8:30 AM

    Great a groups who sole idea is "No Uwe Boll"; might as well just call it "No Uwes Club" then they can just get one...

    Anyway, he's not really the problem with game movies, he sucks, but so do 90% of the franchises he gets to direct. There's also a thing about studios and money, no one is willing to invest in a video game to make an actual movie and nor should they, even good games that could become alright movies (Max Payne for example) just aren't necessary with any kind of budget.

    • reply
      March 18, 2008 9:53 AM

      That was only a small part of the post, and of the business model.

      Beyond the need for "good" movies, which means.. well, no Uwe, it also means:

      - Used Games market: this needs to stop or be restructured. The only people profiting off of this are companies like Gamestop. Publishers, independent devs, etc.. not a dime. Ever. Same actually goes for rentals. Developers never see a dime of the tons of money companies like Blockbuster and Gamefly make of rentals.
      - Publishers serve a very valid purpose, but for many independents, it's near impossible to compete. Until recently, if you wanted a game, you had a publisher. Steam is the chance to break that mold. Publishers will still exist and make games, but suddenly, Steam (and services like it) opens a new world for independents.

      Obviously, your comments were very focused just on the movie aspect of what Radar Group is about, but it can mean a lot more. in the two points I made, that just scratches the surface. Without a publisher, a group like this is critical for the ongoing success of independents that want to remain truly independent.

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