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Weekend Confirmed 168 - The Last of Us, Shadow of the Eternals

by Ozzie Mejia, Jun 07, 2013 11:00am PDT

It's the pre-E3 edition of Weekend Confirmed and hosts Garnett Lee and Jeff Cannata send you into your weekend in a special way by welcoming in Shacknews' Andrew Yoon, as well as Precursor's Paul Caporicci and Denis Dyack. They waste no time diving into the dystopian world of The Last of Us and what makes it one of the best games you'll play this year. Also, there's a brief history of Silicon Knights and Eternal Darkness before candidly discussing the upcoming Shadow of the Eternals, its goals, and its setbacks. The crew also addresses your listener feedback before speculating on the future of consoles and discussing the manifesto from Gunpoint's Tom Francis. Finally, the team sends you into your pre-E3 weekend with a new round of Finishing Moves.

Weekend Confirmed Ep. 168: 6/07/2013

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If you're viewing this in the GameFly application, you can play Weekend Confirmed Episode 168 directly.

Weekend Confirmed comes in four segments to make it easy to listen to in segments or all at once. Here's the timing for this week's episode:

    Show Breakdown:

    Round 1 - 00:00:40 - 00:14:22

    Whatcha Been Playin Part 1 - 00:15:22 - 01:04:22

    Whatcha Been Playin Part 2 - 01:05:51 - 01:37:45

    Segment 4/Finishing Moves - 01:34:31 - 02:09:26

Follow the Weekend Confirmed crew on Twitter, too!

Weekend Confirmed @WeekendConfirmd

Garnett Lee @GarnettLee

Jeff Cannata @JeffCannata

Andrew Yoon @scxzor

Follow Paul Caporicci and Denis Dyack's progress on Shadow of the Eternals:

Website: www.shadowoftheeternals.com

Forums: www.precursorgames.com/forums

Twitter: @ShadowEternals

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ShadowOfTheEternals

Remember to join the Official Facebook Weekend Confirmed Page and add us to your Facebook routine. We'll be keeping you up with the latest on the show there as well.

Original music in the show by Del Rio. Check out his latest music video, I Brought It Here, featuring cameos from Jeff Cannata and Christian Spicer on YouTube. Get his latest Album, Club Tipsy on iTunes. Check out more, including the Super Mega Worm mix and other mash-ups on his ReverbNation page or Facebook page, and follow him on twitter @delriomusic.




Comments

  • So I need to call bullshit on this Edge article claiming Sony's "no DRM" statements are just a pr stunt, and that "game publishers will implement similar policies across Xbox One and PS4"
    http://www.edge-online.com/news/e3-2013-drm-free-ps4-is-a-pr-play-expect-similar-policies-across-both-consoles-say-sources/

    So what makes this article problematic is that it muddies the definition of what DRM is, by conflating the issues of revenue in the used game market with digital license management. What Sony has stated is that it will require a system level fee for the access of online multiplayer through subscription to Playstation Plus.

    What Microsoft has said is they will leave regulation of the used game market to publishers, however they will impose a unilateral system of digital game licenses across media. Meaning however you buy a game, Xbox Live will surveil your right to play that game through the internet.

    Creating a revenue stream to support online gameplay, is not the same thing as using the internet to regulate all gameplay. That said, what Microsoft has said they will leave to publishers, is the right to resell your games. What Sony has said they will leave to publishers is the implementation of a DRM system for checking game licenses.

    So, you know a pay wall for online play is arbitrary, it isn't really the same thing as DRM. I see people comparing these two things like a trade off, but they are not mutually exclusive. You will pay for the right to play online on Xbox One, in addition of having DRM license checks. There's no "insider information" that can resolve that distinction, and there's no insider who can clarify how third party publishers will approach DRM on the PS4.

    All this story amounts to is just vague speculation designed to distract from Microsoft's policies as a platform holder. It is a canard with no factual basis in reality. What we found out from Geoffe Keighly's interviews with executives at Activision, Ubisoft, and EA is that they didn't even know about Microsoft's plans to implement a 24 hour license check before it was announced a few weeks ago.

    Ubisoft's CEO Yves Guillemot similarly told Keighly 3:40 "I'm not sure [the value exchange of used games revenue] has to be changed. I think the way it works today is quite fine." This is the CEO of Ubisoft people. He continued to make the point that as we move into digital publishers will explore new business models, citing Steam weekend sales, as opposed to new ways of DRMing your shit.
    http://www.gametrailers.com/videos/kydmqw/ubisoft-e3-2013--interview--stream-

    This article from Kotaku says that EA played no role in Microsoft's plan to impose DRM on the Xbox One. Peter Moore: "EA has never had a conversation", he later adds, "and I have been present at all of them, with all of the manufacturers, saying you must put a system in place that allows us to take a piece of the action or even stop it. Absolutely incorrect."
    http://kotaku.com/ea-denies-asking-microsoft-for-used-games-drm-512779915

    So the big revelation here is that Microsoft controlling how you consume media, and your rights to consume the media you purchase, are not the same thing as publishers going after the used game market, or simply trying to get more revenue. This has to do with Microsoft's overall vision of turning the Xbox One into a Trojan Horse for all the media you consume. If they control the distribution channels for tv shows, movies, online gameplay, and video games of all sorts, they can charge you whatever the fuck they want.

    Thread Truncated. Click to see all 3 replies.

    • ***REVISION FROM END OF THE 3rd P:
      Creating a revenue stream to support online gameplay, is not the same thing as using the internet to regulate all gameplay. Microsoft said they will leave to publishers to decide, is not the right to resell your games, but the fee associated with reselling your games.

      This does not negate or alter the impact of DRM on the Xbox One. It is simply a clerical detail about how the Xbox One's DRM will be carried out. That said, what Microsoft hasn't announced is what fee they will charge for the trade in of games they publish.

      The announcement that there will be no fixed fee for Xbox One trade ins, means they have to decide how much it will cost to trade in any first party game: be it Killer Instinct, Ryse, or Forza. In fact they haven't even gaurenteed that they will allow trade ins for those titles, or if it will be restricted on a trial basis.

      The bottom line is that even if no one charges a fee for trade ins, the store owners will have to remove your license from any trade in through some special verification. That is because on the Xbox One there is DRM across the board exercised through the most exclusionary, draconian method possible.