Evening Reading

By Garnett Lee, Jan 12, 2011 5:00pm PST I played Uncharted 2 as one of my catch-up-over-the-holidays games and finished it off the other night. After such a fun adventure--one of the best I've played--the last few combat encounters and then the boss fight felt like a tremendous punch to the gut. Someone on Twitter asked if I was suggesting that there shouldn't be boss fights at the end of games. Hell yes I am.

Boss fights grew as a logical extension of the control mechanic-heavy nature of video games in earlier generations. Since then, the content in and way we play games has dramatically evolved. In many games, like Uncharted 2, they no longer feel like an epic showcase and payoff for all the skills mastered in the game. Instead, they become a distracting--or often worse yet, annoying--anachronism. Sure, at the end of God of War III I wanted--nay, needed--a massive boss fight. But at the end of Uncharted 2, all I could think while running the patterns to beat that boss was "God, I wish this would end," and that's not the last feeling such a great game should leave.

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  • AnyDice
    Paging MisterPhoton

    Using what I learned from the Jasper's latest blog post (which I requested and I am super happy he did it) I was able to fully calculate damage per round of my ranger and sorcerer players's main attacks. This takes in to consideration hit chance, crit damage (including crit damage from magic weapons) and handles powers that do extra damage when X of Y attacks hit:
    http://anydice.com/program/4a5
    (switch it to "Graph" view and "At Least" odds for the best way of comparing attacks)

    As for your question, MisterPhoton: The reason his blog example has the weird spikes is because he is modeling it on a level 1 character with no magic weapons, which means crit damage is completely statis; no rolling. My graphs have an extra smooth hump where his spikes are because in mine, the characters roll a considerable amount of extra damage on a crit.


    Next up I am writing the routine that will handle burst and blast powers (which deal the same rolled damage to all hit targets, rather than multi-attack ranged powers which roll for each target hit.)