Weekend Confirmed Episode 43

By Garnett Lee, Jan 14, 2011 12:00pm PST Whatcha' Been Playin? gets off to a big start this week with a lively discussion on the windup to the end and boss fight in Uncharted 2, first impressions of LittleBIGPlanet 2 and Ghost Trick, and, of course, an update from Cataclysm. Garnett, Jeff, and Billy then move on to your continuing comments on the topic of reviews before considering whether you can be addicted to buying games and what happens when a pay-to-play MMO goes free-to-play. Top stories like the brewing storm over Splosion Man developer Twisted Pixel calling out Capcom mobile for ripping off their game, anticipation of the Battlefield 3 unveiling due to come at GDC, and rumors of a Final Fantasy XIII sequel finish the show on a strong note in the Front Page.

Weekend Confirmed Ep. 43 - 01/14/2011

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Weekend Confirmed comes in four segments to make it easy to listen to in segments or all at once. Here's the timing for this week's episode:

Whatcha' Been Playin?: Start: 00:00:00 End: 00:34:10

Whatcha' Been Playin? and Cannata-ford: 00:35:15 End: 01:08:00

The Warning: 01:09:00 End: 01:41:40

Featured Music "Chemistry" by Tyrannosaurus Grace: 01:41:40 End: 01:44:56

The Front Page: Start: 01:44:56 End: 02:15:04

Tailgate Playoffs Wild Card Special: Start: 02:16:05 End: 02:28:37

The Featured Music segment presents Tyrannosaurus Grace, a 5 piece Pop Rock band from Ellensburg, WA. founded in late 2009 by childhood friends Tim Held and Justin Foss. They released their first self titled album in October of 2010 and currently play shows all over the Pacific Northwest as they continue to write and record new material all the time. The members are: Tim Held-Vocals, Guitar, Keyboards, Justin Foss-Guitar, keyboard, audio production, Jeff Gerrer- Bass, David Hoffman- Drums, Lakyn Bury-Vocals, guitar, keyboard. Their album is available on iTunes, Amazon.com, and CDBaby.com. Their website is tgraceband.

Original music in the show by Del Rio. Get his latest single, Small Town Hero on iTunes. Check out more, including the Super Mega Worm mix and other mash-ups on his ReverbNation page or Facebook page.

Jeff can also be seen on The Totally Rad Show. They've gone daily so there's a new segment to watch every day of the week!

Our Official Facebook Weekend Confirmed Page is coming along now so add us to your Facebook routine. We'll be keeping you up with the latest on the show there as well.

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  • On pigeonholing of FPS design:
    I find this question somewhat amusing because its basically a continuation of the trend that brought the FPS to such prominence in the first place. FPSes were doing well, so more and more developers began making FPSes. Then Infinity Ward hit on a FPS formula that does better than others, and now everyone is copying that. However, with each one of these steps, the room for innovation grows smaller. Given the incredible amount of FPSes currently in production, eventually the pace of innovation will slow down to the point that people will grow tired of the "perfected" formula, and then the masses will pick another type of game to make into a mega-hit.

    I'm going to use this question to go to a more conceptual level and ask whether gamers and game journalists have a duty to challenge developers and publishers on gameplay diversity. What is currently happening in the FPS genre demonstrates a process of homogenization in gameplay mechanics and design. Another example is the Mass Effectization of Dragon Age 2. This process had led to a discarding of gameplay mechanics which are still (I believe) perfectly valid, yet nobody seems to be challenging this process of gameplay homogenization. I don't think any of us are comfortable with the idea of a one-FPS future (a bit of an exaggeration there, I suppose), but will gameplay diversity in triple-A titles be so easy to reclaim after throwing it by the wayside? Do we need to protect "endangered genres"?