Shigeru Miyamoto: Nintendo's younger generation is 'taking the lead on Switch development'

Mario's creator focused on projects that raised brand awareness, such as New Super Mario Run and the upcoming Universal theme park.

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In an interview with Glixel, Shigeru Miyamoto talked about the possibility of his impending retirement and who at Nintendo took charge of developing software for Switch.

"We have these younger people in the company who are taking the lead on Switch development and it's really been them that have put this forward and designed this system," Miyamoto explained. "They're the ones that have really shepherded it through the process."

Handing the proverbial torch (fire flower?) to Nintendo's next-generation of designers has freed up Miyamoto to get more involved in other projects such as Super Mario Run and the upcoming Nintendo theme park at Universal Studios.

As far as retirement, Miyamoto's not quite ready to put down his controller yet.

"There was a misunderstanding around my supposed retirement," Miyamoto said. "Really at the time what we were talking about was giving more opportunity and more leadership opportunity to younger people in the company. So rather than me leading everything we were really expanding that role out to others that had come up. Somehow that got misinterpreted as the fact that I was retiring."

Whether or not Miyamoto will make an appearance during Nintendo's Switch presentation, which will be livestreamed from Tokyo tonight at 11pm ET / 8pm PT, is unknown.

Long Reads Editor

David L. Craddock writes fiction, nonfiction, and grocery lists. He is the author of the Stay Awhile and Listen series, and the Gairden Chronicles series of fantasy novels for young adults. Outside of writing, he enjoys playing Mario, Zelda, and Dark Souls games, and will be happy to discuss at length the myriad reasons why Dark Souls 2 is the best in the series. Follow him online at davidlcraddock.com and @davidlcraddock.

From The Chatty
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      January 12, 2017 4:45 PM

      Big'd

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      January 12, 2017 7:35 PM

      Lead/blame if you hate it.

      relax- I think Miyamoto is a great dude.

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      January 12, 2017 7:42 PM

      Hearing "younger generation" from him is always funny. He's talked about how Splatoon was led by a young team. Many of those "youngsters" were there from the start of the SNES days, created Animal Crossing, and made Wii Sports.

      The notion of new people, seniority, length of time one stays with a company, and moving up the ranks is very different in Japan.

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        January 12, 2017 8:29 PM

        Yep. But Nintendo has been lucky with its talent. I believe that kind of office culture is what's hampering development over at Square.

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        January 12, 2017 9:34 PM

        In the States, it's uncommon to be in game development for more than 10 years. Is that different in Japan?

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          January 13, 2017 4:15 AM

          In japanese culture employees often stay with one company until retirement. Pretty much from finishing school to retirement.

          Nintendo's culture, and also japan, is that they won't lay people off when the company isn't doing well. This came up in interviews when the wii u wasn't selling. Nintendo would rather keep the employees for as long as they financially could and move people to other projects rather than let people be unemployed.