Shack Ten: Games to Buy on Sale

With Black Friday coming round the bend, we thought we'd use the opportunity to recommend some games.

2

This week, with Black Friday coming round the bend, we thought we'd use the opportunity to recommend some games worth snagging now that they're going to be slashed for the holiday.


Titanfall 2

(Review)

An improvement on the original in virtually every way, Titanfall 2 couples the ambitious mech-driven combat of the original with a clever and surprising single-player campaign and a host of new weapons. It's the best of Call of Duty, The Iron Giant, and Mech Warrior, all wrapped into one tight little sci-fi shooter.

I'd say it's worth $30 for the campaign alone. It's short, but jam packed with awesomeness. I beat it the other day and want to go through the levels and find my missing pilot helmets. -waxthirteen

Battlefront

(Review)

A reboot of the Battlefront games from the PS2 era, Star Wars: Battlefront circa 2015 has been described as Battlefield in a Star Wars skin. Not that there's anything wrong with that. While the lack of single-player content may deter fans looking to act out a new chapter in George Lucas's space opera, the multiplayer action is fast paced, and thanks to the Frostbite engine, Luke Skywalker and company have never looked so good.

Mirror’s Edge Catalyst

(Review)

Mirror’s Edge Catalyst was DICE’s latest attempt to capture the story of Faith Connors and do it justice. While the story itself isn’t exactly captivating, and many of the plot twists are easy to see coming, the freerunning and parkour are what made the original game such a gem. DICE built off of the systems that fans loved, even adding new devices and gadgets to help bring things to a new level. Mirror’s Edge Catalyst might not feature the best story out there, but if you’re looking for a game that gives you the freedom to explore, and run around without any obscene boundaries, then Catalyst is definitely worth picking up at some point.

It's a good game, disappointing when compared to the first. Sold poorly, yet still got fairly reviewed. I would recommend it for $25. -shirif

Splatoon

(Review)

Splatoon is some of the most multiplayer fun you can ever have with a Wii U title, especially if you limit your interactions to local multiplayer. Unfortunately, its single player portion leaves much to be desired. Clearly designed for enjoying with others, this new Nintendo classic has all the right moves to go down in history as one of the best new IPs the company has seen in years, but unfortunately its lopsided amount of content makes it most ripe for purchase when it's discounted. Once you've exhausted the fun quotient available for multiplayer battles, you might not go back to it for a while, and that's why it's best to skimp on paying full price. But by all means, make sure you do snap it up when you're able to.

Bloodborne

(Review)

Envisioned as a lateral half-step from its popular Dark Souls franchise, FromSoftware's Bloodborne repackages Souls trappings such as bloodstains and weighty combat into a Lovecraftian trek through haunted villages and derelict graveyards. If Dark Souls' combat can be likened to chess, Bloodborne is closer to rugby: combos, multi-faceted weapons, and lightning-fast movement make this spiritual successor its own beast.

Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare 2

(Review)

Plants vs Zombies: Garden Warfare was an unexpected treat, but it didn't seem like a series primed for a sequel like many shooters. Garden Warfare 2 proved itself a worthy successor, though, improving on the first in almost every way and paving a way for regular updates of plants, zombies, and even gnomes. It's a silly, raucous, kid-friendly shooter, but it's also mechanically solid. The multiplayer focus means the package is a little light on the whole, but now that it's going on sale, it's definitely worthwhile.

Firewatch

(Review)

There have been many arguments over the past few months of whether or not Firewatch is in fact a game, or a cinematic experience. No matter which side of the argument you fall into, Firewatch is an excellent experience that should be enjoyed by everyone, especially when you consider the recently added exploration mode, which lets you wander around the beautifully crafted vistas of Henry and Delilah’s forest. What truly makes Firewatch special, though, is its ability to create and bring to life characters completely through voice. Throughout the entire story your character, Henry, is alone. The only communication he has with anyone is through a walkie-talkie. That doesn’t stop his only friend, Delilah, from feeling alive and real, though. In fact, it enforces the feeling and connection between the two, and when the game does come to an end, and that connection is severed, it is a powerful blast to the player’s emotions. It’s an excellent experience that should be enjoyed by anyone willing to get it a chance.

Firewatch has added a bunch of content since release: developer commentary, scavenger hunt, and free-roam modes. Obviously these don't turn it into a different game altogether, and the story adventure is still the main thing when it comes to whether you'll like the game. However if the setting and the screenshots really appeal to you but you were on the fence about putting down $20 for a "walking simulator", a Black Friday sale could be a good time to re-evaluate it. -Johnny Law

Battleborn

(Review)

Talk about bad timing. Gearbox and 2K released Battleborn around the same time Blizzard unleashed Overwatch, its first new IP since StarCraft in 1998. Although the games aren't too similar, anything near Blizzard's orbit is all but doomed to get pulled into a black hole. Don't let that deter you: Battleborn's blend of shooting and MOBA elements result in a unique experience, and Gearbox has buttressed the core design with lots of downloadable content since release.

I think Battleborn was worth it on release and it does have population troubles now, but for cheap enough it is worth a purchase for the singleplayer and co-op elements. Get the Deluxe edition for a bonus two missions that are pretty good. -TraptNSuit

Hyrule Warriors

(Review)

For Zelda fans, a game like Hyrule Warriors is a dream come true. Taking your favorite characters from throughout the series into battle at your leisure is fun no matter what the purpose. But like many musou games, the thrill can run out rather quickly when all you do is cut through enemies like a hot knife through butter. True, there are plenty of scenarios to complete with several characters to do them with, but even that variety can't keep Hyrule Warriors worth a purchase at full price -- unless you're a true, diehard Zelda fan, that is. Even then, you'd be better served picking up something else if you need a new Zelda game to whet your appetite.

Far Cry Primal

(Review)

Ubisoft banged rocks together and generated a spark that grew into Far Cry Primal, a prehistoric spin-off from the more contemporary milieu and themes of its core series. Its overbearing crafting system dampens the fun at the most inopportune moments, but look past that and you'll find a Far Cry game that plays as tightly as its more critically acclaimed brethren.

Filed Under

From The Chatty