Fig is a new crowdfunding site from the heads of Double Fine, Obsidian, and inXile

There's a new crowdfunding game in town and it's one dedicated solely to gaming. Fig is a new crowdfunding venture from the heads of Double Find, Obsidian Entertainment, and inXile Entertainment and they have their first project ready to be funded in the form of IGF Grand Prize winner Outer Wilds.

15

Crowdfunding has been a major trend in video games over the past several years. It has yielded positive results, some less-than-stellar stories, and even some major industry-changers. But crowdfunding is not perfect, especially when it comes to video games. That's why some industry veterans are coming together to help make the crowdfunding space in video games a little better by launching a new platform called Fig.

Fig focuses solely on video games, offering new reward-based crowdfunding avenues. Funded by venture capital firm Spark Capital, Fig is seeking to create a more curated experience for both well-known indies and burgeoning indie development teams. In addition to helping fund projects, Fig will seek to help development teams over the entire life cycle of their game. In addition to that, accredited investors can also engage in investment crowdfunding, allowing them to see a potential return. Fig is hopeful to open similar investment opportunities to all users in the future.

The company will be run by CEO (as well as former Double Fine COO) Justin Bailey. The Fig advisory board will be comprised of Tim Schafer (Double Fine), Feargus Urquhart (Obsidian Entertainment), and Brian Fargo (inXile Entertainment).

Fig's first official project will be Outer Wilds, winner of the 2015 Independent Games Festival Grand Prize. The project will look to be fleshed out by Mobius Digital (Heroes star Masi Oka's development studio) and is seeking $125,000 in startup money. The original trailer from 2013 can be found below.

For more information, visit the official Fig website.

Senior Editor

Ozzie has been playing video games since picking up his first NES controller at age 5. He has been into games ever since, only briefly stepping away during his college years. But he was pulled back in after spending years in QA circles for both THQ and Activision, mostly spending time helping to push forward the Guitar Hero series at its peak. Ozzie has become a big fan of platformers, puzzle games, shooters, and RPGs, just to name a few genres, but he’s also a huge sucker for anything with a good, compelling narrative behind it. Because what are video games if you can't enjoy a good story with a fresh Cherry Coke?

From The Chatty
    • reply
      August 18, 2015 7:02 AM

      Interesting, I hope it goes well for them.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 7:08 AM

      "The company will be run by CEO Justin Bailey"

      New Metroid crowdfunding campaign confirmed.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 7:51 AM

      They're going to kill the last middleman in crowdfunding. Shrewd move on their part. I think it'll take just one "big" game to go on fig to make it a thing. I have backed all of In-exile's projects in the past, so the platform is irrelevant to me as long as it works and is secure.

      I think on a long enough timeline, seeing that delta between what the backers were giving you and what kickstarter was charging would force your hand.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 9:25 AM

      And their first game is by a company whose president is Hiro from Heroes:

      https://www.fig.co/campaigns/outer-wilds

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:43 AM

        He worked in visual effects before he started acting, IIRC.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 2:46 PM

        Outer Wilds is a fucking fantastic game already in Alpha form, I can't wait for the finished project.

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 2:49 PM

          This might be the first game I've ever backed, I like the Alpha that much.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 9:35 AM

      So, a kind of hybrid between pure crowdfunding, ala Kickstarter, and publisher/investor style.

      I can see there being a market for that for some projects, but I don't think this will kill kickstarter for smaller unknown groups at least. It's the 'curated' angle that'll define things. And, the investor thing... idk. that kinda feels like a backdoor to possibly snub gamers if funding goes beyond expectations.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 9:35 AM

      Woah wait.. This is bigger than a crowdfunding site. They want to open up SHARING PROFITS.

      http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2015/08/new-crowdfunding-site-lets-backers-share-in-eventual-game-profits/

      This is going to get nuts.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:37 AM

        Interesting indeed...

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:40 AM

        Although it doesn't let just anyone to invest in the game but this could be good for bringing more people into crowdfunding

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 9:44 AM

          Agreed, my bet is there would be a minimum investment in the multi-thousand dollar range for a percentage of profits, but it is a really cool feature.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:53 AM

        SEC says hello

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 12:13 PM

          Yeah, thats the part that freaks me out. People go apeshit when a game ships late. Wait until the first game actually makes money and people get PAID. Then the first game tanks, people are not going to be able to handle this!!

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:54 AM

        Oh sure after most of us get 1 million bucks.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 10:38 AM

        As mentioned, that's the eventual goal, but it's not starting out that way just yet.

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 12:14 PM

          Yeah, kickstarter has talked for a while about providing an avenue of getting shares, and obviously the SEC and FINRA will be involved in one way or another. But omg it will tilt the axis of publishing when it does, not just for games, but movies, books, etc.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 12:15 PM

        THis is what project cars was about.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 3:03 PM

        Yeah but you have to have at least a million dollars to even think about sharing profits. So for most people this is exactly the same.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 9:36 AM

      Figging? sir mace was into that for a while.

    • reply
      August 18, 2015 9:45 AM

      Didn't Double Fine default on one of their crowdfunded games? :-\ Hard to trust them with crowdfunding endeavors after that.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:50 AM

        Which game did they default on, floofs?

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 9:55 AM

        No, they never did that.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 10:36 AM

        Not really default, but they gave up on Space Base. I think the story was that it was costing too much to design and see through to completion? So they set a stop point and called it done. See Steam reviews for more details probably:
        http://store.steampowered.com/app/246090/

          • reply
            August 18, 2015 10:43 AM

            TLDR for anyone just skimming - didn't default, but ran out of money early and was forced to release to steam early access to try to fundraise more and/or produce an unfinished product

            • reply
              August 18, 2015 10:45 AM

              Yup, then they used the proceeds to finish part 2. I still have to play that some day.

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 11:02 AM

          I don't believe that ever went through crowdfunding just Steam Early access.

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 11:18 AM

          Spacebase was a different story though. Their concept was to try to continuously develop the game only based on the raised funds. This instead of making the game on the final funding amount. So, the campaign was meant to 100% fund the game as far as it could.

          The problem was that it didn't work. The game lacked so many features that it couldn't draw in enough paid customers to sustain the development to get everything completed. They made the decision in a seemingly hasty way; probably after the accountant did a quarterly review and the forecast was grim. So, the wrapped up what features were nearly done, called it 1.0 and said they were stopping development.

          We didn't get the full final game that was talked about. There was still good parts to the game, but you can tell features were designed with other future features in mind. So, it does feel incomplete in some areas. Shame too, because the ideas they talked about were pretty good.

          • reply
            August 22, 2015 2:42 PM

            Well as someone who bought it expecting a full game for my money, I will never buy another Double Fine game.

            Schafer can eat a dick.

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 10:58 AM

        You're thinking of Star Citizen

      • reply
        August 18, 2015 11:35 AM

        Their broken age game wasn't what people were backing. We got a "full game" but its amazing that little bit of game cost that much.

        • reply
          August 18, 2015 2:49 PM

          See this is why people like myself, admittedly a low information person on this subject, have a vague feeling that Double Fine did some shady shit.

          • reply
            August 18, 2015 2:54 PM

            I'm still not sure how someone could get that "shady shit" feeling. Especially in regards to the Double Fine Adventure kickstarter.

          • reply
            August 18, 2015 2:59 PM

            Double Fine is fine, but I'm not sure they're very efficient developers, at least as far as budget goes. Inafune on the other hand...