GOG introduces 30-day refunds for wonky games

As delightful as digital distribution is, you're less likely to get your money back if a game's wonky than you would be with a physical disc. That old DRM-free rogue GOG has upped its customer-friendly practices with a new money-back guarantee, letting customers get a refund within 30 days of buying a game if they can't get it to run properly.

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As delightful as digital distribution is, you're less likely to get your money back if a game's wonky than you would be with a physical disc. That old DRM-free rogue GOG has upped its customer-friendly practices with a new money-back guarantee, letting customers get a refund within 30 days of buying a game if they can't get it to run properly.

The guarantee's good for people who find "technical problems or game-breaking bugs that prevent you from finishing your game," GOG explains in an FAQ. If you meet the game's system requirements and have tried every solution GOG's customer support offers but it still won't go, you can get your money back.

The guarantee launched today, but also applies retroactively to games bought in the last 30 days.

Refund systems can be abused, of course, so GOG warns not to take the mickey. "How many games can you ask for money back? We're humans here, so there's no hard numbers. If it seems like you're exploiting us, we'll let you know and tell you that this will be your final refund offer from us."

From The Chatty
  • reply
    December 9, 2013 6:45 AM

    Alice O'Connor posted a new article, GOG introduces 30-day refunds for wonky games.

    As delightful as digital distribution is, you're less likely to get your money back if a game's wonky than you would be with a physical disc. That old DRM-free rogue GOG has upped its customer-friendly practices with a new money-back guarantee, letting customers get a refund within 30 days of buying a game if they can't get it to run properly.

    • reply
      December 9, 2013 9:42 AM

      If onlyther etailers, like gamefly, would do the same.

      If X-Rebirth has taught us anything, it is this.

      • reply
        December 9, 2013 1:12 PM

        Well on the one hand, most of GOG's catalog is old games they've massaged into running on a modern OS, so the guarantee is less about giving a way to get your money back for a buggy piece of shit as it is the ability to get your money back if the old game won't run on your hardware.

        On the other hand, GOG has an increasing number of indie games and modern stuff so this is a decent precedent, and something that might give them an advantage since right now they're not invited to the Steam party.

        To their credit when Dark Matter pulled a X-Rebirth, they pulled it and issued refunds.
        http://www.pcgamer.com/2013/10/22/dark-matter-appears-to-be-incomplete-gog-offers-refunds-and-revises-game-description/

    • reply
      December 9, 2013 10:26 PM

      Shit's wonked.