Black Ops 2 head says future tech has to be 'authentic and plausible'

Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 head Mark Lamia talks about how the team grounded its future tech in reality, and shares bits on optimizing for the PC version.

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Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 is dipping into the future of war, with high-tech toys that are still likely decades away. A mini-documentary series argued that the depiction is a fairly reasonable look at the future, though it spoke mostly about software hacking as a weapon. The game features plenty of hardware too, and Treyarch studio head Mark Lamia has talked about how they're grounding the drones in reality.

"We try to look at the future in the same way we look at the past," Lamia told AusGamers. "The past has to be as authentic and plausible enough to be able to set you into our fiction, and we look at that when we're doing out [sic] future." He said that to serve this end, the team came up with a "justification and storyline" for all of the pieces of new tech they introduce.

As an example, he used a sniper rifle that can see through walls, and mentioned the TSA scanners that use millimeter wave technology. Then he cited Moore's Law, which states that computer processing power doubles roughly every two years. "So you project that out. Go back to the millimeter wave technology; processing power continues. We also know that as time advances, form factors get smaller. We know that from our own personal consumer electronics devices -- they’re all smaller, things get more efficient."

Following this to its logical end leads to the sniper rifle weapon. "Does that exist right now? No. Does the other weapon exist right now? No. But every single one of those things has a backstory."

Going back to current hardware, Lamia promises that PC players will have an stand-out experience for their chosen platform. The team is optimizing for for DX11, and a proprietary anti-cheat system. "We're doing all kinds of advancements on the graphics engine that is going to, I think, yield great results if you've invested in a new rig. I think the flip side of that is, if you have a rig that's been around for a couple of years, that's fine too. Because we're actually trying to make it play really great on a wide variety of systems."

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From The Chatty
  • reply
    May 29, 2012 7:30 AM

    Steve Watts posted a new article, Black Ops 2 head says future tech has to be 'authentic and plausible'.

    Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 head Mark Lamia talks about how the team grounded its future tech in reality, and shares bits on optimizing for the PC version.

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      May 29, 2012 7:41 AM

      Future tech is full of fat, slow robots.

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      May 29, 2012 8:01 AM

      future tech never seems to have a solution for the standard tripwire.

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      May 29, 2012 9:42 AM

      So, are they talking DX11 like BF3, the Crysis 2 patch, or DX11 like Dues Ex:HR?

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      May 29, 2012 9:57 AM

      Hot --> "The team is optimizing for for DX11, and a proprietary anti-cheat system. "We're doing all kinds of advancements on the graphics engine that is going to, I think, yield great results if you've invested in a new rig." if true.

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        May 29, 2012 10:02 AM

        Based on what they've shown, it's going to be the same old shit they put out. The textures/poly counts on anything that was a vehicle were terrible.

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      May 29, 2012 10:40 AM

      You will never see a walking tank until they can figure out how to make it faster and as low to the ground as an M1A1 Abrams. Tall, slow-moving things on the battlefield are notoriously easy to hit.

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        May 29, 2012 11:05 AM

        Indeed. Beyond even that there's the issue of reliability. One of the major weakness's with a tank is it's tracks. Damage to them makes it immobile, and they're armored as best they can be, and as problematic as it is for field repairs to tracks, it's still something that 'can' be done. With 'legs' for movement though they're completely exposed and no amount of armor is going to protect something that exposed. There's no angles to deflect, no visible defenses to prevent complete contact with a warhead, and gl doing any sort of repair to a hydraulic system which would power a beast like that.

        Slow, easy to hit, and lacking any practical application for urban warfare, let alone tactical or strategic advantage over traditional armor. There's nothing authentic about future military tech that no future military would field. These guys need to read more SF, play MGS4, and consult some military minds before claiming authenticity.

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          May 29, 2012 2:14 PM

          That armor's to heavy for blasters! Switch to tow cables.

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          May 29, 2012 3:57 PM

          or just cater to the star wars fanboys and sell another 3 million units in 48 hours

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        May 30, 2012 5:04 AM

        There is a number of those things on StarWars, specially the new trilogy and Clone Wars, and I always thought where was the point in "walking vehicles". Defintely doesnt seem to add any special advantage. This includes, sadly, the awesome looking AT-ATs of Empire Strikes Back...

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      May 29, 2012 6:49 PM

      It seems almost hilarious to me how they're so focused on the wrong things with this series. Rather than worrying about the details of the storyline/setting, you may want to consider giving the series and fans a rest while you still have a chance to keep the IP interesting. You may also, Activision, want to work on providing a newer, better game engine and graphic overhaul for the series, rather than worrying about whether or not lasers are more appropriate than Gauss technology.