World of Warcraft: Cataclysm Class Changes Detailed

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Blizzard has begun doling out more details on the various changes coming to World of Warcraft's ten classes across the Cataclysm expansion due later this year.

The detailed breakdown encompasses the new abilities, mechanics and such of the Shaman, Priest, Warlock, Warrior, Death Knight, Rogue, Hunter, Druid, Mage, Paladin, joining the earlier details on the MMO's revamped stat and system changes.

Slated to arrive in the "back half of 2010," Cataclysm is set to bring massive changes to the online realm of Azeroth, including two new playable races (Worgens and Goblins), a new level cap of 85, new quests, new zones and changes to existing zones.

From The Chatty
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    April 14, 2010 11:57 AM

    [deleted]

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      April 14, 2010 11:59 AM

      If you enjoyed playing it, isn't that all that matters? What do you have "to show for it" when playing any other game or combination of games vs. WoW?

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        April 14, 2010 12:17 PM

        [deleted]

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          April 14, 2010 1:29 PM

          wow, this post is quite good..

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          April 14, 2010 1:34 PM

          Thumbs up to this post. Almost exactly the reason why I don't play MMO's or get tired of them very quickly.

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          April 14, 2010 10:18 PM

          .... so you're saying that your fiancee hasn't bettered your life?

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        April 14, 2010 12:19 PM

        The thing about WoW was when playing towards the many goals, many times it wasn't "enjoyment". In the early days when I was chasing High-Warlord, I can tell you that less than half of the time I was enjoying the game. Most of the time it felt like work but I couldn't help myself because I became addicted to doing it. That 'chasing the carrot' feeling.

        Even after I got High Warlord and I began raiding, Raids had that same feeling. There is something about MMOs that isn't quite right. I can never play an MMO ever again.

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      April 14, 2010 12:01 PM

      how much time was spent with nothing of value to show for it

      This is often mentioned when talking about MMOs and it confuses me. Games, movies and books all eat your time and leaves you with "nothing of value to show for it". I would hope you had fun spending that time doing it anyway.

      I pour plenty of hours into WoW, movies and books. But I have fun while I do it, which makes it worth it.

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        April 14, 2010 12:08 PM

        I can see where he's coming from. When I read books or watch movies or even play non-MMO's, I get pulled into a story that has a coherent conflict, climax, resolution, etc., and when I am finished, I feel like I walked away with a full experience.

        When I play WoW, I feel like I am just endlessly chipping away at nothing. The only real goal I could gather was just to get better gear, so you can kill stronger stuff, so you can get better gear off of that stuff. Then you use that better gear to kill stronger stuff. It never feels complete.

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          April 14, 2010 12:17 PM

          Half of the experience of WoW for me is the social aspect. The game itself - while great - isn't what keeps me coming back.

          Leading my guild's raids is a totally different challenge all of itself, never mind that I also run the guild.

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        April 14, 2010 12:17 PM

        A lot of people (most?) grind away at MMOs because of the sense of accomplishment / progress. This is fundamental to RPG design; rewards are carefully doled out at semi-random but bounded intervals. The rewards all have functional value which improve your ability to earn future rewards.

        You get loot and gain levels which improve your ability to fight, so that you can gain more loot and more levels. Eventually the levels cap out and then it's all about getting loot so that you can fight better and get more loot. This pushes all the right psychological buttons to encourage addictive behavior. And if you're addicted to the reward cycle, you pay the monthly fee even though you are not having fun with the minute-to-minute gameplay.

        Some people are resistant to addictive behavior, others are not. Telling an MMO grinder to stop playing is not unlike telling a gambler to stop betting or an alcoholic to stop drinking. They know that the behavior is unhealthy, but are unable to overcome the addiction with rational decisions.

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      April 14, 2010 12:21 PM

      What would you expect to gain from playing a video game, other than the entertainment value gained while actually playing?

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        April 14, 2010 12:29 PM

        [deleted]

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          April 14, 2010 1:27 PM

          Sense of progression leading to completion?

          My guild is working on killing the Lich King/Arthas now...after the past few months of progressing through Icecrown Citadel. We only raid 2 nights a week and have a blast while doing it. Well worth the $15/month I spend. And a far highter entertainment-to-dollar ratio then most other things these days.

          All that said, I do take breaks once a year or so for a couple months. Nothing wrong with that.

          Cataclysm though - looks to be a massive undertaking, and I can't wait to explore the new world and see what Blizzard has created.

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      April 14, 2010 1:14 PM

      A lot of players grind needlessly out of a sense to "keep up" with their friends or the community wrt to gear or progression. Neither are important. Gear gets vendored. Run an instance once just to see it.

      As soon as you stop falling in to the endless and futile grind and just enjoy the game at your own pace the more fun you will have.

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      April 14, 2010 1:59 PM

      uhhh .... you found someone to love (fiance) through it. I'd say there's value in that.

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      April 15, 2010 7:34 AM

      I sort of get where you're coming from, but I think its the wrong way to put it, since as others have pointed out you don't exactly "get" anything of value to show with any entertainment.

      Regardless, I played a little bit of WoW (about 30 days /played over 3 years) and whenever I subbed it was just to run around the world and play with friends. The world is fantastic, but yea the leveling and all that can get dull, so I just didn't force myself to do it when it became dull.

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