'We Leave Greed To Others,' Says CD PROJEKT RED of Cyberpunk 2077 Monetization

The developers of The Witcher series let their fans know that they want to maintain the integrity and value of their games.

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It doesn't really take much to convince a Shacker that CD PROJEKT RED is an awesome video game company. It was that love and respect for the company's games that lead The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt to be named Shacknews Game of the Year 2015. The studio has been somewhat silent recently outside of handling complaints about the CD PROJEKT RED's crunch-like development cycles. This weekend they broke the silence about their upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 in response to a tweet claiming that the game would be a "game as a service" to make it more "commercially significant." Their response was pure gold.

It is refreshing to hear that the current landscape of loot crates and microtransactions has not affected CD PROJEKT RED's vision of Cyberpunk 2077. "We leave greed to others," could definitely be construed as a shot at EA after the tough Star Wars Battlefront 2 launch they have had with multiple stumbles regarding monetization of the game. Either way, it is refreshing to hear that Cyberpunk 2077 will be nothing less than The Witcher 3. If they can live up to that claim, it could very likely be Shacknews Game of the Year 2077.

Asif Khan is the CEO and majority shareholder of Shacknews. He began his career in video game journalism as a freelancer in 2001 for Tendobox.com. Asif is a CPA and was formerly an investment adviser representative. After much success in his own personal investments, he retired from his day job in financial services and is currently focused on new private investments. His favorite PC game of all time is Duke Nukem 3D, and he is an unapologetic fan of most things Nintendo. Asif first frequented the Shack when it was sCary's Shugashack to find all things Quake. When he is not immersed in investments or gaming he is a purveyor of fine electronic music. Asif also has an irrational love of Cleveland sports.

From The Chatty

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      November 20, 2017 7:37 AM

      CD Projekt is a fantastic company, but I would also like to point out that the Polish złoty is worth almost 1/4 of the USD. The economics of making video games in Poland makes way more sense than making video games in North America.

      Basically, I cannot see a world in which making AAA games the way we make AAA games in high cost-of-living regions is sustainable. North America and northern/western Europe are great places to live, but for the companies that make games here, the budgets are quickly getting untenable.

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        November 20, 2017 8:05 AM

        I'd much prefer higher initial costs to games over this nickel and dime structure that they're moving towards.

        I wouldn't mind paying $80, even $100 up front for a game if that meant I got everything and would never even have to consider spending another dime on it.

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          November 20, 2017 8:07 AM

          I wouldn't mind doing that either if I got to try the game out first. I'm rarely, if ever, going to gamble 80 or 100 on something that might suck.

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          November 20, 2017 8:07 AM

          microsoft tried this lootbox card system shit with their singleplayer games. Like forza, Halo 6, even tomb raider.

          Thankfully most proper stuff isnt like that yet. hopefully it goes badly for them

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          November 20, 2017 9:23 AM

          Same. I know we can't apply this to every game but if Bethesda said they would have to charge $80 for the next Elder Scrolls game due to the increasing cost of developing games, I would pay that.

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          November 20, 2017 10:22 AM

          part of the problem is the people that spend thousands.

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        November 20, 2017 8:59 AM

        There are a number of locations in the US where it would be financially far more feasible, but no one wants to have an office there.

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          November 20, 2017 9:47 AM

          Cleveland?

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            November 20, 2017 9:55 AM

            Sure, Detroit, Kansas City, plenty of areas that are a much lower cost of living than on the coasts where the salaries that are considered affordable for game development will actually allow something close to a decent standard of living.

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              November 20, 2017 10:39 AM

              Yup, anywhere but the coasts and maybe a tiny number of key cities between.

              Even large cities like Chicago or DFW have cheaper suburban areas with relatively reasonable COL indexes.

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                November 20, 2017 11:11 AM

                Eh, Chicago is still pretty expensive and IL in general isn't a business friendly state. Dallas is pulling some of these companies already though.

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          November 20, 2017 10:24 AM

          I was trying for years to get something spun up in Minneapolis. Good tech center, lots of big companies (Target, General Mills, Best Buy, etc) a good tech college, great cost of living, etc.

          But since it's not on a coast no one cares, even though I could make 4 games for the budget of a single one in San Fran. Sigh.

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            November 20, 2017 10:28 AM

            You have snow and stuff. People are apparently willing to pay through the eyeballs to avoid that.

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              November 20, 2017 10:32 AM

              weird thing was all the people I would have hired were natives (or at least native enough to not mind) it was the investors that couldn't see past the geography.

              I shared an office with a couple of investment brokers who were MSP natives but who worked for a firm in SFO and they straight up told me that they thought it would be impossible to get funding without a coastal ZIP code.

              Bleh.

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                November 20, 2017 3:57 PM

                Why not setup ghost office in California and keep your real office in snow town ?

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                November 20, 2017 4:14 PM

                At least snow doesn't burn down houses. My only problem with winter is when it drags on for too long. I like the 3/3/3/3 season method which I'm not certain even exists anyplace anymore. Upstate NY starting with Summer July the seasons feel like 2/2/6/2

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              November 20, 2017 10:39 AM

              Eh, I think its more chicken and egg, people don't want to relocate somewhere where your employer is the only employer for what you do.

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                November 20, 2017 4:23 PM

                This is part of it for sure. To up and move to a new state for one job is a big decision. If it doesn't work out, or even just simply want to move on in a few years, you're gonna have to do it again. With a tech hub city, you can change jobs without needing to move again, or at most you'll have to move to a different city in that state.

                Take it from someone who just moved from Florida to Oregon, I don't want to do a move like that ever again. But even though i'm in a coastal city, I'm probably going to have to in a few years because Intel is the only major tech company here. California definitely has it's problems, but everything's already there. But it looks like more states are getting companies to build there, like Phoenix, so hopefully everything starts to normalize soon.

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      November 20, 2017 9:50 AM

      on my face plz

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      November 20, 2017 11:40 PM

      Good for them, sci fi Witcher world sounds amazing, I hope they address the gameplay though