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Seven: The Days Long Gone, The Isometric RPG from ex-Witcher Devs, Sneaks Its Way Onto PC Next Month

The game features a new climbing mechanic that has isometric RPG fans excited.

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Created and developed by ex-Wticher developers, Fool’s Theory & IMGN.PRO (Kholat), Seven: The Days Long Gone has gone gold and will be available on Steam next month. The game features some new climbing and traversal gameplay mechaincs and has some stunning visuals. 

Here is the full PR blast:


About the Game

In SEVEN: THE DAYS LONG GONE, you play as Teriel, a master thief possessed, in the most symbiotic ways possible, by an ancient daemon (Artanak) and deported to the prison island of Peh. Teriel, with Artanak’s help, unearths the island’s dark secrets, and soon learns that the fate of the entire Vetrall Empire rests in the balance.

The post-apocalyptic world is filled with mysterious technology and Dark Age superstition, diverse communities that react to every action, and a rich ecosystem of creatures to interact with, from animals to people to monsters. You are free to explore the vast yet unforgiving sandbox world, whether following the main story line or heading off on a side quest.  

Traversal & Movement  

SEVEN: THE DAYS LONG GONE takes the traditional 3D isometric RPG and reinvents it with a climbing and movement system unique to the genre. What defines a master thief is movement, and Teriel can climb over walls, leap over chasms, slip through windows, grab hold of ledges, roll to evade projectiles, jump over charging enemies, or slide into enemies. Teriel can also pick locks, hack electronics, and keep to the shadows to avoid detection.

Game Features

  • 3D Isometric RPG w/ a rich, interwoven storyline
  • Combat: multiple styles allow for players to be creative in how they tackle obstacles
  • Hero Progression System: Based purely on skill and equipment; progression unlocks new upgradable skills
  • AI Reactions: NPCs are responsive to actions
  • Open Sandbox world perfect for exploration
  • Brand new climbing system
  • Stunning environments
  • Play Your Way - Stealth or brute force, it’s freedom of choice

Seven: The Days Long Gone launches on Steam on December 1, 2017. At launch, the Standard Edition is 29.99 EUR/29.99 USD/27.99 GBP, and the Digital Collector’s Edition, which comes with a digital artbook, Marcin Przybylowicz (composer of Witcher 3) soundtrack, map, and guidebook, is 39.99 EUR/39.99 USD/37.99 GB.

Asif Khan is the CEO and majority shareholder of Shacknews. He began his career in video game journalism as a freelancer in 2001 for Tendobox.com. Asif is a CPA and was formerly an investment adviser representative. After much success in his own personal investments, he retired from his day job in financial services and is currently focused on new private investments. His favorite PC game of all time is Duke Nukem 3D, and he is an unapologetic fan of most things Nintendo. Asif first frequented the Shack when it was sCary's Shugashack to find all things Quake. When he is not immersed in investments or gaming he is a purveyor of fine electronic music. Asif also has an irrational love of Cleveland sports.

From The Chatty

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      November 10, 2017 9:15 AM

      First I've heard about this, looks great.

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        November 10, 2017 9:18 AM

        Yeah it looks really good. Level design seems super neat.

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          November 10, 2017 9:24 AM

          It seems like everything is real time in the trailer, which does not computer in my head along with isometric RPG, but I'm willing to give it a go.

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      November 10, 2017 9:31 AM

      I don't like the "from ex-witcher dev" stuff...

      When my game comes out next year, I'm not including my cv with it... It'll be my project, for better or worse and will have to stand on its own legs, even though I know I could scrounge up some extra sales from saying stuff like that

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        November 10, 2017 9:37 AM

        Then you'll be your game's own worst enemy. Your game might be the most awesome thing to hit steam that week but if no one knows it, nobody gives a shit, and as the weeks go by fewer than that even give it a glance. I've seen too many good indie games suffer from devs that don't care about promoting it.

        There is nothing shameful about appealing to the goodwill of your fans. You'd be surprised how many people give your game a glance just to see what you've been up to.

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        November 10, 2017 9:47 AM

        Marketing is super important. Use your CV. Use your credentials. It's the only way you'll be noticed.

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          November 10, 2017 9:55 AM

          Just seems cheap... It was a team effort, I added some great stuff to the game like twerking while mocapping the male prostitutes but still... I don't think I like it

          I left these big companies to do my own thing, I'd feel bad trying to use their success

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            November 10, 2017 10:01 AM

            Their success was your success too. If you don't want to do it for you, do it for your fans and teammates.

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            November 10, 2017 10:15 AM

            They used your success to help build a great product.

            The lessons that you learned in creating fabulous things are embedded into your work.

            Own your past work, man. You deserve it.

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              November 10, 2017 10:16 AM

              I live in Edmonton, and I can tell you, I can't fucking turn my head without seeing: "Ex-BioWare dev is doing __________."

              It's par for the course in the industry, and honestly...the studios shouldn't mind. You guys gave your blood, sweat, and tears to make incredible things. The least they can do is let you acknowledge the fact that you were part of the team.

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            November 10, 2017 5:37 PM

            their success? it's your success if you were there

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            November 10, 2017 8:25 PM

            Nah man, you helped build it. Use that to your advantage

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          November 10, 2017 9:57 AM

          Yeah, hearing this is from ex-Witcher devs puts it way higher up on my "check this out" list.

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            November 10, 2017 10:09 AM

            Definitely this

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              November 10, 2017 10:22 AM

              Dang. Some food for thought I guess

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                November 10, 2017 1:12 PM

                Bruh. Moral stands don't put food on your plate. Shamelessly pimp your product using whatever means necessary.

                Also I suggest you call yourself Soapy Chicken Studios. Fucking catchy.

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            November 10, 2017 11:57 AM

            same here.

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            November 10, 2017 12:13 PM

            same - i recognize everybody's but a tiny part of a huge team, yeah, but it gets my attention anyway

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            November 10, 2017 3:26 PM

            Me too, great headline Asif.

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              November 10, 2017 3:27 PM

              I wasn't going to read the article until I saw it was by some guy named Asif talking about Ex Witches.

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            November 10, 2017 4:37 PM

            I wouldn't have even clicked on generic-titled isometric RPG article if it didn't say "from ex-Witcher Devs". I'm not excited for the game after seeing what it is, but I've at least got some idea of what it is.

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            November 10, 2017 8:39 PM

            And its that way for a lot of stuff, i checked out and eventually bought grey goo because of ex-westwood. I bought torchlight because ex diablo guys

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        November 10, 2017 6:50 PM

        Honestly part of it is just an easy shorthand for signaling that you've had AAA development experience; the fact that it also happens to be one of the most lauded RPGs of all time is even more of a bonus.

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        November 11, 2017 1:01 AM

        Well maybe there’s a different way you can put it. In the case of these Polish developers, you’ve got someone like Bloober Team. They put themselves forward first as the psychological horror guys, since that’s what they want to keep specializing in and want to be known for, and then underneath that they mention they have some ex-Witcher guys on the team.

        The truth is, if you were a Polish developer in the past 10 years, 85% chance you worked on a Witcher game, haha, so I totally understand how you might want to separate from just that.

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        November 11, 2017 1:08 AM

        I don't like it either, but it would help for sure. Not as a main selling point, just a footnote to get noticed in the crowd.

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      November 10, 2017 9:32 AM

      This looks awesome.

      It reminds me of Darkstone (if anybody even remembers that game)

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        November 10, 2017 9:50 AM

        Played the shit out of darkstone when I was like 11. Loved that game.

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          November 10, 2017 9:59 AM

          It was good stuff! I liked how they handled the loading if different areas and the nifty see through building stuff.

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        November 10, 2017 8:13 PM

        that game had exceptionally awesome music.

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      November 10, 2017 10:06 AM

      Interesting, and not fantasy which I thought. The traversal stuff reminds me of silent storm, which is up there with X-COM

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        November 10, 2017 10:10 AM

        Seems more action rpg than rpg like Divinity though

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      November 10, 2017 4:23 PM

      Oooh, interesting!

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      November 11, 2017 1:18 AM

      FUCK YES.

      Mark of the Ninja sucked ass (long time stealth veteran and before the 3rd person RPG it was my fav genre) it's about time we get that in 3d. This game is now in the center of my radar.

      Before you freak out about what I said about Mark Of The Ninja, it did suck, it was trial and error at its maximum and it's lack of save anywhere made that trial and error a chore of 2004.