BioShock

PC, XB360, PS3 / Action / Release: Aug 21, 2007 / ESRB: M

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DRMgate 07: BioShock Copyright Protection Keeps 2K Controversy Burning

In a story that has truly swept the nation, 2K Boston and Australia's BioShock release woes continue. The newest complaint stems from the PC version of BioShock, which uses SecuROM copyright protection, preventing users from installing the game more than two consecutive times. Responding to the concerns, steadfast 2K Games community manager and soon-to-be mental patient Elizabeth Tobey explained the issue in a thread on the 2K Games forum. "You can uninstall and reinstall this game, and if, by chance, you have 2 computers you want to simultaneously play this game on, you also can do that," she said. "If by some chance you are reinstalling this game without uninstalling it first, a lot, there is a chance you may have to call securom and get a key, or deactivate some older installations." Unfortunately, reports have been coming in that a simple uninstall does not allow another installation of the game. Those who have contacted 2K Games for support have been directed to SecuROM--those who have contacted SecuROM were told to call 2K Games. Like a tough puzzle in an excellent, genre-advancing PC shooter, gamers have turned to the internet for help. The tail-chasing spurred 2K Boston's Ken Levine to stop his white Ford Bronco long enough to make a statement: "I've followed up on the circular email with securom and we are working on this issue. I agree, it sucks, and we need to get that sorted," he said in a thread on the 2K Games forums. "I've been told by 2k that we will." Former president Bill Clinton declined to comment on the contentious issue when contacted by Shacknews. Expect more miscellaneous BioShock news as we think up further iterations of the "gate" naming convention.

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"Anti-piracy measures only punish the lawful. I'm tired of dealing with these activation stuff. ..."
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Creative Director Ken Levine on BioShock

On the eve of BioShock's release, at a Boston launch party complete with costumed splicers and glowing green shots served in syringes, I sat down with Irrational Games--now 2K Boston and 2K Australia--co-founder and creative director Ken Levine, the formidable mind behind not only BioShock but classics such as System Shock 2 and Thief. I spoke with Levine about the massive collective internet hysteria over BioShock, challenges and arguable missteps in development, how his design role has changed, exhibiting creative freedom in game development, how to sneak philosophy into action games, and much more. Come back next week for the second part of this epic interview--but be sure to complete the game first. In the followup, Ken and I delve deep into the plot points and themes of BioShock for an in-depth discussion about the world of Rapture, its philosophies, and its unforgettable heroes and villains. For a critical appraisal of BioShock, check out Carlos Bergfeld's review. Otherwise, read on--and rest assured, this installment of the interview is spoiler-free. Shack: How does it feel to have the game hit such a critical mass of hype? It seems like suddenly the buzz shot through the roof. Ken Levine: There's a book called The Tipping Point, which is not about gradual change, but a point where things radically change. It talks about prime rates, where things go off a cliff, up or down, and the reasons why. BioShock, and I think video games in general, I think we in the industry misunderstand how gamers think. We think most gamers are like us--journalists and developers--where we scour every page for information, but in reality, most gamers think about games like we think about Diet Coke or Oreos. Shack: Yeah, I'm very aware of that having worked in retail, but it's easy to forget.
"In reality, most gamers think about games like we think about Diet Coke or Oreos."
Ken Levine: Yeah, they go to the store and say, "Oh, there's a new game out. Awesome!" But maybe there's a friend in his group who goes to GameSpot or Shacknews and he's reading about every game, and there's one game that, when it gets cool enough, he'll tell his friends about it--but he's not going to tell his friends until it's cool. BioShock, at some point, hit a point where the hardcore gamer in every group said, "Okay, that shit's cool," and told their friends about it. That started happening after that event in New York, and then built up recently. We've never been through anything like this before. It's gratifying, because I want to make more games like this. The money and everything is nice, but no matter who you are nobody is going to give you $20 million to make some screwed up game if it doesn't sell well. I love these kinds of games, from our first game, and I've really been dreaming about popularizing these kinds of games. Hopefully, this is the one that does. Shack: Do you think in five or ten years, games like BioShock will be more common, or an anomaly? Ken Levine: It's hard to say. What is it about the game that's appealing to people? I think it's always very hard to tell. I went to a lot of people you wouldn't think of as gamers who were interested in the game because of the aesthetic and the vibe and the mood, whereas I think if they saw a System Shock 2 or a Deux Ex they may not care because as much. Aesthetics draw people in and introduce people to gaming in general, at least for this type of game. So it's unclear whether it's particularly BioShock, or if it's that people like these kind of mechanics. I hope it's the mechanics, because I love these kind of mechanics, but we cared a lot about the aesthetic and the world.
"Marketing it as 'The ultimate in first-person Objectivist shooters' is not really the right path to go."
One thing I realized while making BioShock was that we had a lot of arguments about what people liked in System Shock 2. In reality, I think the fact that the world is so interesting, and the kind of interactions you can have--more than any specific gameplay, it's the fact that you're in this world that's very unique, and you can interact with that world on many levels, is what makes it fascinating. It's not this stat system or that stat system. Make an interesting world, and let people interact with it in unprecedented ways. Shack: For me, the single most appealing thing about BioShock is its aesthetic--its world, its philosophical considerations, its visual design, and so on. Now obviously the combat gameplay is a big part of it too, but I notice that marketing focuses almost exclusively on those elements. The back of the box mentions combat alone, with no allusions to the greater themes. Did you find you had to manipulate how you presented the game to different groups? Ken Levine: You know, marketing it as "The ultimate in first-person Objectivist shooters" is not really the right path to go. [laughs] I think you really have to sneak up on people. You have to mix in that stuff. If you beat people over the head with it, they're not going to be interested. We were really careful about story. My parents don't know anything about video games, and they asked if gamers were going to be interested in these kinds of themes. Well yeah, if you can mix Objectivism and freaky mutants, they might be interested. If you just give them Objectivism, probably not. The medium is about entertainment.
"I want to push forward in the context of what you can do within an action game."
I think about movies like The Matrix, which tries to inject all kinds of heavy themes, but within the context of a great action movie. I think the problem with the second two movies is that they stopped being great action movies and got too caught up in the themes. Lord of the Rings has themes of the seductiveness of power, but you've got to have the orcs, and the trolls, and the dragons. BioShock is the same way; you've got to have the splicers, and the plasmids, and the Little Sisters, and the Big Daddies. Shack: That said--and I assume you will answer this in the negative--would you ever consider making a game like this without combat, or without very much combat? When playing BioShock, I got the sense that the world is so rich and compelling that one could theoretically develop a game there not centered around combat. Ken Levine: Well, I like shooting stuff. [laughs] I've never been a fan of adventure games, but obviously, that's another medium that's been used to tell stories. At the end of the day, I'm a game first kind of guy, so I don't know if it's something I'd do. I'd probably do it as a book or a movie or a comic book or something. I just want to push forward in the context of what you can do within an action game. Our goal was always to be shooting and telling stories at the same time, and that was a goal with BioShock. We wanted to have our cake and eat it too. Continue reading for Ken's thoughts on BioShock's hacking mini-game--and why he might have done it differently if given the chance--creative freedom with 2K Games, building on System Shock 2, expanding aesthetics in video games, and more. _PAGE_BREAK_ Shack: How did you end up with the hacking mechanic? It comes off as an uncharacteristically abstract component in a game where most elements are intrinsically tied to the game's story and themes? Ken Levine: Yeah. There was a period of the game design that I was less involved, and a period where I was more involved. At the beginning, I was involved with the story, but not so much the game design. That was an element that was designed back then.
"If we could go back and do hacking again, we would have maybe rethought that a little bit."
I think that we also didn't know the game was going to have the budget it did, so we had to express that idea and we had very limited tools to do it. There was a huge contingent of people who, when we tested it, loved the hacking game. Shack: Oh, I think it's fun in its own right, it just doesn't seem as organically part of the world as other parts. Ken Levine: It's a little out there. That's why it was important that you could bypass it in two ways; you can buy it out or you can use the hack tools--or you can just ignore it. There's only one hack you have to do in the game. But I think if we could go back and do it again, we would have maybe rethought that a little bit. I think it was more a function of our limitations at the beginning of the project when we had a very limited budget, and then we zoomed in so many other areas that we sort of forgot to go back to that area. Shack: Speaking of those early budgetary uncertanties, Irrational employees have spoken on the initial difficulties in securing adequate funding for the game. Even with the recently publicized issue of the Little Sister scenes being toned down, when you play BioShock it feels like a game whose developers were given a surprising level of creative control. How did you go from those troubles to having all this freedom? Ken Levine: We had more than one choice when we were selling the company, and we chose the company that would give us the most creative freedom. 2K did give us pretty much complete freedom on the game, and I don't know if every other publisher would have done that. There was really no time when they said, "No no no." Still, I don't think it's a game that's very exploitive in any way. We were careful to choose our moral challenges and deal with those in a way that highlighted what the moral challenges were. If anyone ever played this game and was getting off on violent situations with a child, that would repulse me. It was about the moral inflections.
"If anyone ever played this game and was getting off on violent situations with a child, that would repulse me."
In the same way you watch a movie like Schindler's List and you watch Amon Goeth comment and do horrible things, it's important that you show those things, but you don't enjoy them. That was an important step for games to take, but we had to do it in the right way and the publisher was very supportive. Shack: You mentioned you would like to do more games in this vein. Speaking of moral choice, do you think it would be possible to push the idea of moral inflection further, beyond binary choice or more nonlinear? Is that a technical question? Ken Levine: I don't know. To me, the moral choice of BioShock was inherent to the story. That's one of the few things that came out of the story, not the other way around. It's not like every one of our games needs to have moral choice. It's not a crusade of mine. For some people it is. Sometimes you want to make a movie about moral choice, and sometimes you want to make Raiders of the Lost Ark. I think it was really necessary and central to this game. If it were a different franchise, I'm not sure it would be part of it--maybe even in another story in the BioShock world, I don't know if it would be part of it, but it was a part of this one. It's not a back of the box feature to me, it's an inherent part of the game. Shack: This game is well known as a spiritual successor to System Shock 2, and as BioShock has been more widely seen and played many people have pointed out some striking similarities even down to particular aspects of the world and plot. That game was acclaimed, but did you feel like BioShock was a chance to try that sort of thing again with more commercial success this time? Ken Levine: We have a bunch of people who worked on that game, including myself, who like that kind of game and want to build on that type of game. It wasn't a crusade. I think for a lot of gamers it is, and I understand that. System Shock 2 was very different from System Shock in a lot of ways--it had those RPG elements, and character growth. I think if it was that kind of crusade, instead of making BioShock--which is very distinctly BioShock--I would have made Blystem Block. That's not what we wanted to do. We wanted to make our own world. We just always had certain design elements. I went to Looking Glass because I loved those elements. I changed them around for System Shock 2, with things I came up with and the other guys came up with.
"Games like System Shock 2 have been hampered by limited budgets and to a degree an insensitivity to aesthetic and vibe."
BioShock was a continuation of that, but it wasn't a crusade. I'm really happy if it means there are more games like this, because I want to play those games. They've always so far been hampered by limited budgets and I think, to a degree, an insensitivity to aesthetic and vibe. They're a little stiff. I think that's why it was so important with the BioShock aesthetic not to be like that. Shack: I have a friend who's not a hardcore gamer, but who saw some BioShock footage on TV and asked me about it simply because he loved the Art Deco design. Ken Levine: I don't know if the world of Deus Ex and System Shock are ever going to appeal to my wife. Not because of the gameplay, but because people have trouble getting past the other elements, the super hardcore cyberpunk things. Look at The Matrix--they took cyberpunk and made it stylish and fashionable. It's like System Shock, with the hacker, but instead of all cyber-y, it's all cool and sexy and stylish. I think that's important. Shack: The game world is astonishingly coherent and inventive, and fortunately gamers seem to be responding very well. When you were developing the game, did you have any sense that what you were making would resonate so strongly with people? Ken Levine: No. Honestly, it's always very hard to tell when you're up close. A few months ago, I was playing it, and I thought, "I don't normally play our own games this much." The aesthetic was always beautiful, and I knew that would work, but with the gameplay and the story, I didn't really know. I thought people would say, "Well... It's not as good as this," or, "It's not as good as that." It's really hard to tell. You just have to go to work every day and do what you think is right. I'll do level reviews and say, "This doesn't feel right, that does feel right. Change this, change that." I look at parts of the story, I fire actors, I hire new actors. You have to use your gut. Trust me, I've been there; your gut can be wrong, and your gut can be right. I think that in this case our gut was right more often than it was wrong. Shack: How's X-Com going? Ken Levine: [laughs] I don't know what you're talking about. Shack: Thanks for your time, Ken. Always a pleasure.

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Aspect Ratiogate 07: BioShock Widescreen Working as Intended, Says 2K

In the continuation of a shockingly divisive story of many aspects and epic proportions, 2K Games has responded to allegations that BioShock's widescreen view is flawed, asserting that the various display modes are showing nothing but what was intended by the developers. "We went through dozens of iterations and finally settled upon a widescreen aspect ratio that best suited the gameplay experience," said 2K community manager Elizabeth Tobey in response to the scandal. "Once this FOV was established, we chose to keep exactly the same horizontal FOV for standard def displays, so as not to in any way alter the gameplay experience. "Instead of cropping the FOV for 4:3 displays and making all 4:3 owners mad in doing so," she continued, "we slightly extended the vertical FOV for standard def mode: we never wanted to have black bars on people's displays... We felt that it best served our goal of keeping the game experience as close as possible to the original design and art vision on both types of displays. "We did what we thought was the best thing for the game: developing and optimizing it for widescreen displays, and making the decision not to do the usual crop for 4:3 displays. As a consumer, you certainly have the right to disagree." Some folks have already taken up arms in opposition, releasing an unofficial patch for the demo that increases the widescreen field of view. Despite the controversy, Shacknews stands by its BioShock review score. We pledge to keep you updated from the Widescreen Situation Room as the Story of the Week continues.

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BioShock Widescreen Slices Vertical View

Related Topics – BioShock, 2K Games

In a rapidly-expanding thread on the 2K Games forum, reports are

coming in that 2K Boston and Australia's just-released shooter BioShock (PC, X360) uses a cropping method for its widescreen display, cutting down on the vertical view rather than expanding the horizontal width (illustrated left). The problem apparently exists for both the PC and Xbox 360 versions, and cannot be fixed with an edit of the game's FOV (field of view) setting. Read more »

"This is not a problem. Hardly anyone would have made an issue about this is the internet and ..."
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BioShock PC Demo Released

The BioShock PC demo is now available for download on FileShack. Here is your thread to anticipate things and things. Firstly, it's been made very clear that you are going to need the latest NVidia or ATI drivers for your videocard. So here are the links that you will need :

With the help of Limelight Networks we will be pushing some pretty massive bandwidth for Mercury members for the demo. Feel free to grab a download accelerator if you are a Mercury member. The Quicksilver servers support them and the BioShock demo will be available there.

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"That demo was fucking awesome. I still have splicers screaming in my ears and I finished 10 ..."
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BioShock PC Demo Coming Monday August 20th

2K Games has confirmed that the PC demo of Irrational's 2K Boston and Australia's BioShock will be released for download Monday evening around 7pm EST. The company was sure to note that new ATI and Nvidia video card drivers will be released the same day, and should be installed for best performance. The BioShock demo will be of an impressive 1.84GB in girth that you will be able to eagerly gulp down at FileShack. The demo will also be available on the new FileShack Quicksilver system for Mercury members with support for download accelerators with multiple connections. In a following update on the company's Cult of Rapture website, BioShock creative lead Ken Levine warned users away from potentially spoiler-filled forum posts and implored users not to post spoilers themselves. "Please don't ruin other people's experience by revealing secrets in unmarked threads, and if you want to enjoy the game to its fullest, stay away from any threads that might ruin the fun for you," wrote Levine. "With a game like BioShock, it will really make a difference. Look for a new Shacknews interview with Levine in the coming days.

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"i had to bring my 7800gt down to 1000x650 or something for smooth fps, gorgeous game anyway."
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BioShock Review

Irrational Games--now 2K Boston and 2K Australia--has birthed a beautiful, swollen demon of a game with BioShock, rupturing at the seams with magnificent style. It's a game that ensnares you with grand tendrils of dread that you readily embrace, following a trail of molded, blood-soaked breadcrumbs you can't help but devour. It is in the presentation--the story and setting and oh-so-precise placement and timing of events--that BioShock becomes something of substance and relevance, a work of actual eminence. A quick introductory movie of a man in a plane over the Atlantic in 1960. Crash. And now you're in control--uninterrupted control for nearly the entire extent of the game--wading through the wreckage and fire and smoke toward a gloomy lighthouse--but it's already begun. The semblance of free will given by your direct control of the protagonist Jack is a facade. Your only choice is to enter the lighthouse, climb into the waiting bathysphere, descend (ascend?) to Rapture, and be led into darkness through a meticulously scripted chain of events. A failed underwater utopia borne of idealistic dreams, Rapture has an unmistakable majesty and honor, even in disrepair. Meant to be a capitalist's Randian paradise where the free market has the final say, the opulent, '20s-inspired Art Deco look of the city's stylings--think the Chrysler Building writ large--reveals the monumental intentions founder Andrew Ryan had for the city, as well as the relatively short amount of time that has passed since the colony's inception. The reality of Ryan's dream is so exaggerated from the beginning--a sign under a large golden head reads "No Gods or Kings, Only Man"--that it can enter into the realm of surreal. The duality of an ocean-floor Xanadu in complete disrepair serves as a prelude to the duplicity of Rapture's inhabitants and dueling forces that combine to create the seductive atmosphere of fear and confusion. Cornball advertisements for genetic enhancements paper the walls, saluting independence and biological freedom--while loudspeakers emit hammy radio announcements filled with attempts to control the minds of the masses. Seemingly innocent young girls, the Little Sisters, walk though the darkened corridors of Rapture, chaperoned hand-in-hand by hulking grotesques, the Big Daddies--monstrosities in hissing, mechanical diving suits, with an over-sized drill where an arm should be. You buy genetic enhancements, Plasmids, with ADAM, an organic currency extracted from the dead by the innocent Sisters. You use EVE to fuel your Plasmid-enhanced powers. After your first injection of Plasmids--your first taste of the fruit of this rotting garden--there's no going back. Though the confines of Rapture are sprawling, packed with hidden "treats" and discoveries and auxiliary pathways, the events of your exploration are beautifully choreographed. A handheld radio soon puts you in contact with survivors of Rapture's fallout, leading you from one goal to the next. Tape-recorded diaries from Rapture's past serve as the primary storytelling mechanic. They reveal more as you progress, the poignant desperation of residents, the unwritten history of Rapture's main players--you'll end up wanting to seek out these fascinating artifacts to know everything you can, even though the more you learn, the more uncertainty arises. Every encounter with Rapture's host of genetic misfits--the aforementioned Big Daddies with their Little Sisters, as well as the frenetic and disfigured Splicers--has a certain dramatic heft to it. You may stumble upon a Little Sister gorging herself on ADAM as a Big Daddy stands guard when a Splicer wanders too close to the Big Daddy's precious partner, setting off a ferocious quarrel to which you've become privy--and in which you may become possibly included. The combat in BioShock is intensely visceral, especially when squaring off with a Little Sister's single-minded protector. Though most of your battles will be against the various types of Splicers, you'll have to take on Big Daddies if you want to grow in power, as only Little Sisters control Rapture's supply of ADAM. The second you pick a fight with a Big Daddy, it will attack you full-bore, moving with a terrifying, unexpected speed. And once it lands its first blow, you've lost a huge portion of your health, your camera view reeling, your vision blurred, your movement slowed, your view of Rapture suddenly an unstable, bobbing mess. You're stumbling, gasping for breath. It's too bad you usually die shortly after this part, because it's an incredible feeling, watching your character struggle to survive such tremendous physical harm. Luckily, dying isn't too costly. You may lose a few Med Kits or EVE, but you respawn in one of the game's Vita-Chambers scattered fairly comprehensively throughout Rapture's corridors. And because the Big Daddies serve as protectors, not aggressors, you can easily avoid confrontations with these uglies if you wish. I sometimes made the mistake of taking them on too early, when I was too weak. The opportunity to destroy a Big Daddy isn't ephemeral--they serve as a standing challenge in all of the game's areas, waiting to receive or administer a brutal beating at your leisure. You're given a standard arsenal of weaponry--pistol, machine gun, shotgun--and your Plasmid abilities to fend off Rapture's legion. Though the game is most definitely an adventure at heart, you'll be battling baddies nonstop in the style of any modern shooter. You'll get to customize your weaponry--say, increasing the firing rate or damage of a pistol--in addition to customizing your physical Plasmid loadout. With limited slots reserved for Plasmid abilities, as well as physical, combat, and engineering abilities received from "tonics," gene-swapping kiosks allow you to prepare for the situation at hand. An abundance of security cameras may call for a Plasmid that sics Rapture's alarm squad on unsuspecting Splicers. What I found most satisfying about BioShock's weaponry was its predictability. That is, it emulated real-world dynamics more successfully than I've seen in a game. Setting fire to a Splicer with the Incinerate Plasmid causes it to run toward water. Shocking a Splicer in water with an Electro Bolt Plasmid--perhaps while it is dousing its burning body--hurts doubly. The invaluable Telekinesis Plasmid allows you to create a bullet-blocking shield by holding objects in mid-air, and throwing a 150-pound body at a Splicer will cause it serious harm, despite its apparent rag-doll lightness. The higher-order deranged characters you come across in Rapture are truly masterworks in every respect. They present their sick tendencies in such a way that there is almost reason to their insanity--but not quite. The voice acting is flawless. The tasks you'll take based on your interaction with them in Rapture are intriguing, ranging from ordered assassinations to flower gathering. Of the few qualms I have with BioShock, the chief amongst them was an ubiquitous "hacking" mini-game, required to get discounts in vending machines or turn security cameras on your side. It became an exercise in tedium fairly quickly, but was optional, and also avoidable. Also, the game presents the notion that you have a choice of significant consequence regarding the Little Sisters. After defeating a Big Daddy, you can choose to kill them and collect a large amount of ADAM, or rescue them and collect less. I have to say I felt little moral confusion at this point; it was essentially deciding between two endings for the game, though following the same path along the way. It is not often that I play a game, as an adult, and truly feel that, yes, this is something different, something appropriate. BioShock could be played as a brain-dead shooter, but even then, gamers might still unintentionally glean something meaningful from it. It is impossible to enter the world of Rapture without feeling something. The game screams at you to look--See this! Know this! Think! It is immersive and impressive. It is elegant and ugly. And it is here for you to enjoy and play and appreciate in any way you see fit.

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BioShock Demo Hits XBLM, PC Demo En Route; Updated: PC Demo News, Free Art Book

Update 3: The BioShock PC demo will be at FileShack on Monday August 19th at 7pm EST as detailed here. Update 2: As the demo-induced BioShock frenzy continues, 2K community manager Elizabeth Tobey has announced the release of a free downloadable BioShock art book. The PDF-format book is print-ready. Update: 2K Games has announced that the PC demo of BioShock is "in its final stages of testing and approval," and is planned to be released this month. The company did not definitively announce whether the demo will be released before the game's August 21 release date, but an announcement is expected soon. Original story: Following the announcement that a BioShock-related announcement would be announced tonight on SpikeTV, journo Geoff Keighley announced availability of an Xbox 360 demo now downloadable via Xbox Live. Publisher 2K Games followed the announcement with its own announcement on The Cult of Rapture, the company's site dedicated to the game. Many users attempting to download the demo have announced unusually slow download speeds, suggesting Xbox Live is being heavily taxed by the demand. Along with the announcement of the Xbox 360 demo, Cult of Rapture overlord (and Shacker) Elizabeth Tobey announced a PC version of the demo will be released "later this month." Further announcements regarding a PC demo will be announced tomorrow, Tobey announced. BioShock ships next week. In related news, Shacknews Ltd. today announced its intention to cover any further announcements regarding BioShock demos or announcements regarding announcements related to BioShock demos.

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BioShock Goes Gold as Irrational Loses Name

Irrational Games, the acclaimed developer behind PC classic System Shock 2 as well as nearly-released SS2 "spiritual successor" BioShock (PC, X360), is no longer known as Irrational Games. The formerly independent studio, whose two branches were acquired by Take-Two Interactive last year under the 2K Games label, are now known as 2K Boston and 2K Australia. Take-Two claims change will result in no loss of creative control for the companies. "We're proud to be part of the 2K Games family and enjoy the new opportunities and artistic freedoms this strengthened relationship provides," said Irrational president Ken Levine in a statement. "The name change signifies our growing position as a central part of 2K Games, and we plan to ensure our future titles continue to set new standards of quality and innovation for the industry." 2K and Irrational 2K representatives were unavailable for comment. In a separate announcement, Take-Two announced BioShock has gone gold. The game will be available for PC and Xbox 360 in North America on August 21 and in Europe on August 24.

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BioShock Podcast

The Cult of Rapture page on the 2K Games website has a new podcast on the game, this time covering Plasmids.

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BioShock Previews

bit-tech.net and Team Xbox both have new BioShock previews, going hands-on with the game.

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BioShock PC Info

BioShock PC Blowout on 2K Games' Cult of Rapture website offers all kinds of information and media related to the PC build of the highly anticipated action game. You'll find find PC interface screenshots, a podcast with staff members of Irrational Games Australia, and a system specs list.

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BioShock Music Q&A

Music 4 Games is featuring an interview with Garry Schyman, asking the film, television, and video game composer about his work on BioShock.

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BioShock Impressions

Also on display at E3 is BioShock, due out this August. Impressions can be found at GameSpot, Action Trip and IGN.

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BioShock Podcast

2K Games' Cult of Rapture site has been updated with a new BioShock podcast. This time Ken Levine talks about Andrew Ryan, founder of BioShock's Rapture city.

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