Weekend Confirmed 177 - EverQuest Next, Pikmin 3, NCAA Football 14

By Ozzie Mejia, Aug 09, 2013 11:00am PDT

This week's Weekend Confirmed looks at old things that are new again. Hosts Garnett Lee and Jeff Cannata welcome in Shacknews' Andrew Yoon and Insomniac's James Stevenson to discuss EverQuest Next and World of Warcraft before diving into NCAA Football 14 and Pikmin 3. After discussing listener feedback, the team discusses the use of game guides and whether they enhance or take away from the overall gaming experience. That discussion leads into a new round of Finishing Moves to send you into your weekend.

Weekend Confirmed Ep. 177: 8/9/2013

Subscription Links:

Here's a handy pop-up player so you can listen from right here on the page. Let us know how it works for you.

If you're viewing this in the GameFly application, you can play Weekend Confirmed Episode 177 directly.

Weekend Confirmed comes in four segments to make it easy to listen to in segments or all at once. Here's the timing for this week's episode:

    Show Breakdown:

    Round 1 - 00:00:17 - 00:10:27

    Round 2 - 00:11:25 - 00:48:37

    Round 3 - 00:49:14 - 01:42:27

    Round 4/Finishing Moves - 01:43:02 - 02:27:56

Follow the Weekend Confirmed crew on Twitter, too!

Weekend Confirmed @WeekendConfirmd

Garnett Lee @GarnettLee

Jeff Cannata @JeffCannata

Andrew Yoon @scxzor

James Stevenson @JamesStevenson

Remember to join the Official Facebook Weekend Confirmed Page and add us to your Facebook routine. We'll be keeping you up with the latest on the show there as well.

Original music in the show by Del Rio. Check out his latest music video, I Brought It Here, featuring cameos from Jeff Cannata and Christian Spicer on YouTube. Get his latest Album, Club Tipsy on iTunes. Check out more, including the Super Mega Worm mix and other mash-ups on his ReverbNation page or Facebook page, and follow him on twitter @delriomusic.

Click here to comment...

Comments

  • On the issue of guides in games like Fallout and such, where, supposedly, the whole point of the game is the experience:

    When I was playing Fallout 3, I got stuck on a part of the main quest, where I was confused as to what I was supposed to do. The game told me to talk to a certain person, but doing so brought nothing up that was helping me. For nearly 3 hours, I banged my head up against a wall, looking around for anything I may have missed, but nothing helped.

    Finally, I looked up a guide, which explained the issue- the quest was glitched in my save, and there was nothing I could do to continue the main quest line, short of going into the console command so I could go into no clip mode. So, if I had not broken down and looked at a guide, I may have wasted even more time trying to figure it out. This incident broke any trust in those style of games to be able to navigate through them without outside help.

    As a result, I have no more hesitation at looking up a guide for those types of games because if I come upon a roadblock, how do I know if it's due to a glitch or not? Why should I waste hours of my time because the game is bugged? Maybe it's ruining part of the experience, but that's an acceptable alternative to spending hours accomplishing nothing.


    As for the Dragon's Crown discussion-

    I felt it was unfairly misleading of Garnett to claim that the people criticizing the character designs were advocating censorship.

    Censorship is when you try to ban or alter a work to suppress aspects of that work that people find objectionable. This is not an attempt for censorship. They aren't asking for any kind of ban; they aren't asking retailers not to sell it; they aren't asking the government to punish Atlus, the game's publisher; they aren't asking that the content be altered or removed through a patch or a re-release. Nobody is making an argument about whether the developers have the right to release a game with this kind of content. As somebody who is uncomfortable with the designs, I found it frustrating to hear Garnett mis-represent the argument.

    I'll give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he misspoke or didn't consider his word choice, but it would still be nice to get some sort of acknowledgement about it.