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Weekend Confirmed 73 - El Shaddai, Dead Island

by Garnett Lee, Aug 12, 2011 11:00am PDT
Related Topics – Weekend Confirmed

Legend has it he lives by the Konami Code and topples maniacal bosses with a single Hadouken. Man-God Shane Bettenhausen of Ignition Entertainment joins Xav, Jeff, and Garnett this week, and brings with him an in-depth look at their new game due next week, El Shaddai. But there's much more than it to cover in a Whatcha Been Playin? that includes Dead Island, Hard Reset, and the intriguing Runespell: Overture that combines fantasy RPG with a mythical poker system for combat. In the Warning Garnett takes a moment to reset last week's Diablo 3 rant before handhelds and the ramifications of the 3DS price drop become the central topic of discussion. Xav catches us up on the latest news and sparks some good debates before it all comes to a close with Finishing Moves.

Weekend Confirmed Ep. 73: 08/12/2011

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If you're viewing this in the GameFly application, you can play Weekend Confirmed Episode 73 directly.

Weekend Confirmed comes in four segments to make it easy to listen to in segments or all at once. Here's the timing for this week's episode:

  • Whatcha' Been Playin Part 1: Start: 00:00:00 End: 00:29:26

  • Whatcha' Been Playin Part 2: Start: 00:30:00 End: 01:00:50

  • The Warning: Start: 01:01:45 End: 01:31:19

  • Featured music Awdbawl "Fame" produced by Nasty Face: 01:31:19 End: 01:34:09

  • The Front Page news: Start: 01:34:09 End: 02:12:21

Awdbawl is a rapper from the south bay currently part of the LessIsMore Collective with his latest song "Fame" produced By Nastyface. The Video was directed, shot and edited by Ryan on our Weekend Confirmed staff.

Watch Less is More Collective on YouTube.

Listen to Less is More Collective Music on BandCamp.

Original music in the show by Del Rio. Get his latest Album, The Wait is Over on iTunes. Check out more, including the Super Mega Worm mix and other mash-ups on his ReverbNation page or Facebook page, and follow him on twitter delriomusic.

Shane Bettenhausen works at Ignition Entertainment, publishers of El Shaddai, due out Tuesday August 16.

Jeff Cannata can also be seen on The Totally Rad Show. They've gone daily so there's a new segment to watch every day of the week!

Remember to join the Official Facebook Weekend Confirmed Page and add us to your Facebook routine. We'll be keeping you up with the latest on the show there as well.




Comments

  • As I was listening to Garnett comment some more on his problems with the Diablo 3 auctioning, it reminded me of a past episode last year when BLeahy, Jeff and Garnett were discussing the micro-transactions incorporated into Team Fortress 2, all of them seemed quite ambivalent to it, and BLeahy even pointed out that it was basically 'free money' on the table, so it made sense to put it in business-wise.

    To me, this is interesting because "the spoiling of game experience" was cited as the common complaint from the community, yet the WC crew didn't really fight the micro-transaction aspect, nor did they really agree to it. Yet Garnett made his rather impassioned views known regarding the game experience of Diablo 3. So what changed? I think this is a case of one being much too close to the game, as none of the three was playing Team Fortress 2 with any regularity (if at all).

    Now personally speaking, I stand by my opinion that the concern for the auctioning is not at matter of the tainting of the game experience, but more the direct economic impact since Blizzard are in control of the game items, and have the power to nerf or buff items, and directly affecting the inherent market value of the item (details on that I made on previous week's post... which sadly no one commented on). But all that is neither here nor there.

    The point I'm trying to address is whether sometimes we so close to something that any changes will be seen with a critical eye and high sensitivity. I would consider myself a passive Diablo player, so I personally am not as sensitive to some of the PvP aspect or even the auctioning itself. But I was sensitive to the change in game style for Fallout 3 since I was a huge fan of the Fallout series (and as far as I know, Brotherhood of Steel doesn't exist...), I was very cold to Fallout 3, until I played it, and absolutely enjoyed it. I imagine this was similar to the change in style from Resident Evil 3 to Resident Evil E4. From that point on since Fallout 3, I've taken to that position where when a franchise or game that I loved in the past gets adapted, remade, or sequel-ized, I would take a step back and not judge before the game has come out. Deus Ex: Human Revolution is my current test.

    How many of you are aware of the closeness to a particular franchise, could be ruining your anticipation and enjoyment of the subsequent release? Have you managed to adapt to it, or are you just adamant that you are right?

    Thread Truncated. Click to see all 2 replies.

    • This is probably a weird example, but Tetris.

      I've been a fan of the game since the NES, and I remember playing the GBA version (Tetris Worlds) for the first time and thinking "Oh, God. They've completely fucked everything up!"

      Now, I still don't like the ghost piece, I'm indifferent towards (and never really use) the hold function, and to be fair, Tetris Worlds does kind of suck, but the crux of my complaint, and one you'll hear a lot from former fans, is that the lock-delay (the ability to both spin and nudge a block around the board after it's already landed) effectively "breaks the game."

      I've since kept up with newer versions of Tetris, and two things happened. One, they've continued to tweak the lock-delay so that it's not quite as broken as it was, and two, I realized why they made the change in the first place. The thing about classic Tetris is that it tended to be a bit of a stop-start kind of game, because at just about any time, a wrong move could potentially mean putting yourself into a hopeless situation. With the newer, more fluid controls, it's possible, if you keep your head on straight, to pull yourself out of a sticky situation. Yes, this does mean that the game is easier overall as a result, but the objective is to keep you in the flow, because in the flow is where Tetris is at it's best.

      Aside from that, I can't think of too many cases where I was overly distraught by changes made in a game series I liked. Mind you, I'm a Nintendo fan, so a number of my favourite games don't change all that much. ;)