Parody Game Promoting Bulletstorm Analyzes What It Means When 'Duty Calls'; Still No PC Demo

By Xav de Matos, Feb 02, 2011 10:45am PST

The marketing muscle behind the upcoming People Can Fly shooter Bulletstorm have taken the time to examine the horrors of modern war. Apparently, they're as impressed with current combat as they were with space marines.

In a parody game for PC entitled "Duty Calls: The Call Before the Storm," players run through a "real-life war scenario" as a modern day soldier firing bullets that scream "boring" as they land into verbose enemy characters. (Watch the trailer after the break or on the game's official site.)

In a subtle effort to take shots at Activision's Call of Duty franchise, the free game includes such features as picking up meaningless sticks and ruled paper, killing enemies in slow-mo for very specific reasons, and ranking up like crazy. Subtle means not coded at all, right?

Want to answer the call yourself? You can download the game from FileShack now.

So, what's the point? EA wants you to know that Bulletstorm is going to be crazy and modern war games are super boring. In unrelated news, EA announced the latest Medal of Honor has now shipped five million units since launch.

Hey, this totally makes up for the lack of a Bulletstorm demo on PC, doesn't it?!

According to EA, Duty Calls features the following:

  1. Duty Vision slows down the action so you can unload a storm of bullets

  2. Immersive dialogue from the front lines

  3. Cold, calculated realism

  4. Killing animations motion captured from real actors

  5. True-life reloading system allows for mistakes in putting the cartridge in the gun

  6. Iconic sound effects

  7. Thwart an enemy threat that could topple the country and possibly the world

  8. Significant and historically accurate props

What is doesn't feature in the 800MB download is a demo for Bulletstorm on PC. In case you missed it when we mentioned that earlier.

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