Weekend Confirmed Episode 20

By Garnett Lee, Aug 06, 2010 12:00pm PDT It's anything but a lazy midsummer's show as a Whatcha' Been Playin? packed with heavy-hitters including Civilization 5, Starcraft 2, and Madden 11 gets Garnett, Brian, and Jeff off to rocking start. There's so much in there that Cannata-ford a New Game spills over to the third segment before giving way to the Warning. Your thoughts on why developers try and compete with the likes of Halo and Modern Warfare for multiplayer shooters starts the conversation which also includes choosing the right place to sit when gaming, and a brief look at the issues raised this week on Gamasutra concerning whether focus testing resulted in Activision abandoning female action heroes. News from EA's investor reports hits the Front Page along with one of our favorite games, Torchlight, getting the sequel we all hoped for announced.

Weekend Confirmed Ep. 20 - 08/06/2010

Subscription Links:

We've got a handy player to listen to the show right here on the site if you like:
Listen to Weekend Confirmed Episode 20 (player window will pop-up)

And if you're on GameCenter, you can play the show here:
Download Weekend Confirmed Episode 20

Weekend Confirmed comes in four segments to make it easy to listen to in segments or all at once. Here's the timing for this week's episode:

Whatcha' Been Playin: Start: 00:00:00 End: 00:31:37

Whatcha' Been Playin and Cannata-ford a New Game: Start: 00:32:50 End: 01:01:40

The Warning: Start: 01:02:48 End: 01:38:25

Music Break "Weather the Storm" by Verbal: Start: 01:38:25 End: 01:41:26

The Front Page: Start: 01:41:26 End: 02:13:39

Music Break this week comes from Montreal-based hip hop artist Verbal. The featured track "Weather the Storm" is available on iTunes, Rhapsody, Napster, and Limewire stores. For more from verbal and the Northern Lights (NL5) hip hop collective check out the NL5 MySpace page.

Original music in the show by Del Rio. Get his latest single, Small Town Hero on iTunes and check out more at his Facebook page.

Jeff can also be seen on The Totally Rad Show. New episodes come out weekly on Tuesday.

Our Official Facebook Weekend Confirmed Page is coming along now so add us to your Facebook routine. We'll be keeping you up with the latest on the show there as well.

Weekend Confirmed will be taping live at PAX! Hope you can join us Saturday, Sep 4 at 2pm in the Serpent Theatre.

Click here to comment...

advertisement

Comments

See All Comments | 43 Threads | 159 Comments
  • My thoughts on the "female lead" issue:

    1) I'm a huge fan of "strong and not-super-sexualized" female lead in fiction.... this is strongest for me in books and movies, but also applies to games.

    2) I agree with Brian that most lead characters in games are so thin, it hardly matters... what he didn't say, was that this is very much on purpose in most cases. Think of how many RPGs start you out with some kind of amnesia.... the point is that if the lead is really going to be "you" the game cannot tell you who you are... that's for you to determine via game play.

    3) But the issue is complicated, because some games do allow you to play more fleshed-out characters. Heavy Rain, for example, allows you to play a weak male character, a strong female character, a hard boiled male character, and others. These characters were richer, but note that being male or female wasn't an issue. They were just characters.

    4) Ultimately, the whole women's movement thing is still confusing simple issues, in my opinion. I suggest seeing people as people and also allowing people to be sexual and sexy: both male and female. Humans are sexual creatures, and there has never been anything wrong with that.

    For me, the issue of talking about gender is similar to the "race" issue: some things get to the point that talking about them does more harm than not talking about them. The reason is that true equality means realizing that pointing differences out is part of what stops the issue from being equal, and simply allowing people to what they are.

    The essence of any person will always be much more important than their skin, genitals, or other surface issues.

    Any well written characters will be interesting, and the sex is irrelevant. Which is essentially what Brian was implying.