Nintendo Denies Motion-Sensing DS Successor, Says New Wii Zelda Out 'When It's Perfect'

By Alice O'Connor, Jan 13, 2010 8:47am PST Nintendo has denied that its eventual successor to the DS will feature motion-sensing and stepped back from a supposed launch frame for the new Wii Legend of Zelda title.

A recent interview with CEO Satoru Iwata in Japanese newspaper the Asahi Shimbun reportedly revealed details on the inevitable but as-yet unannounced handheld, but Nintendo of America senior director of corporate communications Charlie Scibetta has told Kotaku that "The answer to the reporter's question was misinterpreted."

"Mr. Iwata did not make any comments regarding the functions of Nintendo's future hardware systems," Scibetta outright denied.

Asahi Simbun also reported that the untitled next Wii Legend of Zelda title would be released this year, which Kotaku noticed on the latest episode of Wii's Nintendo Week show that Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime would not commit to anything.

"The key message that [creator] Mr. Miyamoto and [producer] Mr. Iannuma is telling us is that it really has to be perfect when it launches," said Fils-Aime, assuring "know that the Zelda title for Wii will come out when it's perfect"--though that could still be this year.

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  • As much as I love Zelda games, I wouldn't mind waiting until the end of this year or even Q4 2011 for the next installment. In fact, I'd prefer it. The wait between Link's Awakening and Ocarina of Time was five years, and the wait between LttP and Ocarina was seven, if you don't consider handheld Zeldas to be true installments. The longer waits bred more anticipation in the gaming community: what sort of adventure awaited? What sort of bosses would be featured? What would the over world look like? What new items would accompany Link's tried and true arsenal?

    While every Zelda since Ocarina has been excellent, the gaps between releases have seemed too narrow: Ocarina, 1998; Majora's Mask; 2000; Wind Waker; 2003; Twilight Princess, 2006. People have come to expect a new Zelda every two to three years, and while each has made an impact in its own right, the community didn't seem to vibrate with eagerness like it did during the five-year (or seven-year, if you prefer) wait that eventually gave us Ocarina of Time.

    Of course, Ocarina's jump from 2D to 3D can't be overlooked. Although I don't believe the new Zelda will bring about an equally dramatic change in structure, shorter wait times do seem to have prevented from Nintendo thinking outside the box where Zelda is concerned. Since the formula is so successful, it's probably pretty easy to remain consistent to Ocarina's (admittedly excellent) mechanics and simply focus on crafting an adventure to fit that mold. But imagine if Nintendo were able to take a few extra years and really focus on doing something innovative with Zelda while still incorporating the elements that fans have come to love. Delays and the like can be either good or bad in the case of any developer, but in Nintendo's case, I'd argue a strong case that only great things can come of waiting.

    Of course, I can't disregard the fact that there have been dozens upon dozens of excellent releases in that timespan. There are always other games to play besides the one a certain community REALLY wants to play above all others (just ask StarCraft and Diablo fans!). Even so, I still think Zelda releases would benefit from longer spans of time between releases. Absence makes the heart grow fonder, especially for this Zelda fan.